Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlets

An Occasional Outburst, an arrow shot into the future, a harbinger. Edited since 1996 by Gavin J. Grant and Kelly Link. LCRW contributors include many writers whose names you may know (Karen Joy Fowler, Ursula K. Le Guin, Molly Gloss, Carol Emshwiller, Jeffrey Ford, Ted Chiang) and many more whose name you may not — and that there finding and reading unfamiliar voices is one of the joys of existence.

We like reading short stories and eating chocolate and are very happy to supply the best in both to readers. And, er, chocolate eaters. Does this read clearly? No. Fortunately we have better writers in the zine than we (by “we” I mean me, Gavin) have writing about the zine.

December 2021. 64 pages. Ebook ISBN: 9781618732033

Who is ready for the fourty-eleventh issue of LCRW? It has stories, poems, a cooking column.

Cometh the hour
cometh the zine
but wait
it is written
that a zine
must sometimes be delay’d

Reviews

“All are very well written.” — Paula Guran, Locus

“Read it slowly and savor the language.” — Sam Tomaino, SF Revu

fiction

ArLynn Leiber Presser, “Napier’s Constant”
James Blakey, “The Last Mission”
Kate Francia, “A Minor Demon in Adams B-12”
Jen Sexton-Riley, “All I’ve Ever Learned from Love”
Laurie McCrae, “A Kindling”
Richard Butner, “Holderhaven”
James Moran, “A Story Isn’t a Story Until it’s Heard by Someone Else”

poetry

Brady Rhoades, Three Poems
Ben Corvo, The Slipper Ships

nonfiction

Raymond J. Barry, “I Had a Meeting Thenwith My Agents”
Nicole Kimberling, “Hot & Cold: Meatballs & Mash”

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 44, December 2021. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618732033. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413-585-0414). Subscriptions: $24/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions: EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2021 the authors. All rights reserved. Cover illustration “Mother Cat” © 2021 by Ashley Wong (ashlwong.com). Thank you authors, artists, and readers. Celebrating! Sofia Samatar’s A Stranger in Olondria appearing on NPR’s 50 Favorite SF&F Books of the Past Decade; Kim Scott’s Taboo receiving a Kate Challis Ruth Adeney Koori Award (RAKA) commendation; and Vandana Singh being selected as a Climate Imagination Fellows by ASU’s Center for Science. Petra Mayer, RIP. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women writers and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above.

About the Authors

Raymond J. Barry’s career began during the sixties and seventies when he became a member of three of New York City’s major, avant-garde theater companies: the Living Theater, the Open Theater, and the Wooster Group. He also performed in numerous productions both Off Broadway and Broadway, including two dozen productions at Joseph Papp’s Public Theater. After twenty-three years of New York theater, he embarked upon his film career, performing approximately fifty major films and dozens of television roles, including Michael Cimino’s Year of the Dragon; Oliver Stone’s Born on the Fourth of July; Neil Burger’s Interview with the Assassin; Falling Down; Flubber, and, of course Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story, directed by Jake Kasden, among many others. He also played roles in dozens of television series, highlighted by his six-season role as Arlo on the FX Series, Justified. He is the author of a memoir, Never a Viable Alternative, and a volume of plays, Mother’s Son and Other Plays, and his paintings can be viewed on his website, raymondjbarry.org.

James Blakey lives in the Shenandoah Valley where he writes mostly full-time. His story “The Bicycle Thief” won a Derringer Award. When James isn’t writing, he can be found on the hiking trail—he’s climbed forty of the fifty US state high points—or bike-camping his way up and down the East Coast. Find him at JamesBlakeyWrites.com.

Richard Butner’s story “Holderhaven” was first published in Crimewave and was a Shirley Jackson Award finalist. His first collection, The Adventurists: Stories will be published in early 2022. He has written for and performed with the Little Green Pig Theatrical Concern, Aggregate Theatre, Bare Theatre, the Nickel Shakespeare Girls, and Urban Garden Performing Arts. His nonfiction, on topics ranging from computers to cocktails to architecture, has appeared in IBM Think Research, Wired, PC Magazine, The News & Observer, Triangle Alternative, and Southern Lifestyle. He lives in North Carolina, where he runs the annual Sycamore Hill Writers’ Conference. He and Harry Houdini have used the same trapdoor.

Kate Francia is a writer in the New York area. Her stories have appeared in Electric Lit, Fireside Magazine, and Beneath Ceaseless Skies. She has an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College in Speculative Fiction. You can find her at katefrancia.com.

Nicole Kimberling has only just now started cooking dinner for guests again after almost two years without offering anyone except her wife a plate of food. She’s barely able to contain her excitement about it long enough to function in her day job as editor of Blind Eye Books. She also written several novels and even an audio drama podcast called “Lauren Proves Magic is Real!” which, like her column in this zine, is also about food and cooking—just on the supernatural level.

Too restless for his own good, Laurie McCrae is a Canadian immigrant to Scotland by way of England and Ireland. He lives by the sea with his partner and their young son.

James Moran is a professional astrologer and author who regularly publishes fiction, nonfiction and poetry. His published work can be found at jamesmoran.org and he can be found on instagram @astrologyjames.

ArLynn Leiber Presser comes from a long line of writers, including notable science fiction and fantasy writer Fritz Leiber who devised the first modern Dungeons & Dragons game. She is the author of thirty-seven books, almost all romances. The most recent is This One Last Palmer’s Kiss which combines elements of true love, phlebotomy, guns, and otherworldly murderous intentions.

Brady Rhoades’ work has appeared in Best New Poets 2008, Antioch Review, Faultline, Georgetown Review, Notre Dame Review, William & Mary Review, and other publications. He has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize three times. Rhoades is a journalist who works and lives in Fullerton, California.

Jen Sexton-Riley’s short fiction and poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Daily Science Fiction, on Cape Noir Radio Theater, and elsewhere. She is a 2018 graduate of the Clarion West Writers’ Workshop, and she writes a monthly comedy/horror advice column, Dear Agony, for the Great Lakes Association of Horror Writers. She can be found at jensextonriley.com, on Twitter @sextonfleur, and on Instagram @jensextonriley.


June 22, 2021. Phew. 64 pages. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731968

Four score and three issues ago this zine did not exist. Two score and three issues ago LCRW popped into being just like the big bang — but with less burning hot plasma and fewer planets forming.

Reviews

“My favorites were three very different fantasies. Quinn Ramsay’s ‘The House of the Gutter-Prince’…. Colorful and fun. A story could hardly be as different, then, as ‘Acting Tips for Remaining Unknown’ by Jim Marino … makes a familiar trope new again. Finally, Kathleen Jennings’ ‘Gisla and the Three Favors’ is in the traditional form of a fairy tale…. This is at once a wholly traditional fairy tale in its shape, told beautifully and resolved matter of factly and honestly. Lovely.”
Recommended Reading:
‘‘Gisla and the Three Favors’’, Kathleen Jennings
‘‘Acting Tips for Remaining Unknown’’,  Jim Marino
— Rich Horton, Locus

fiction

Alisa Alering, “The Night Farmers’ Museum”
Erica Clashe, “The Shine of Green Floors”
Leah Bobet, “The Mysteries”
Joanne Rixon, “Wires from the Same Spool”
Quinn Ramsay, “The House of the Gutter-Prince”
Jim Marino, “Acting Tips for Remaining Unknown”
Zack Moss, “If You Had Been Me Then What Would I Have Been?”
Kathleen Jennings, “Gisla and the Three Favours”
Gillian Daniels, “King Moon’s Tithe to Hell”

poetry

Anne Sheldon, “Three Poems”
Jessy Randall, “Four Poems”

nonfiction

Ayşe Papatya Bucak, “Half-Papatya”
Nicole Kimberling, “Time Travel Self-Care System”
About the Authors

cover

Catherine Byun, Cover & Interior Monkeys

Made by
Gavin J. Grant
& Kelly Link.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 43, June 2021. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731968. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413-585-0414). Subscriptions: $24/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions: EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2021 the authors. All rights reserved. Cover illustration “Black-and-White Monkey” © 2021 by Catherine Byun (catherinebyun.com). Thank you authors, artists, and readers. In reasons to celebrate Elwin Cotman’s collection Dance on Saturday was a Philip K. Dick Award finalist. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women writers and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above.

About the Authors

Alisa Alering lives in Indiana where she reports on innovations in science and technology. Her rather unscientific fiction has appeared in Podcastle, Clockwork Phoenix IV, and Flash Fiction Online, among others and has been recognized by the Italo Calvino Prize. She is currently at work on a novel about two sisters prepping for the apocalypse in 1980s Appalachia.

Leah Bobet is a novelist, editor, and critic whose novels have won the Sunburst, Copper Cylinder, and Aurora Awards, been selected for the Ontario Library Association’s Best Bets program, and shortlisted for the Cybils and the Andre Norton Award. Her short fiction has appeared in multiple Year’s Best anthologies and been transformed into choral work, and is taught in high school and university classrooms in Canada, Australia, and the US. She is guest poetry editor for Reckoning: creative writing on environmental justice‘s 2021 issue. She lives in Toronto, where she makes jam, builds civic engagement spaces, and plants both tomatoes and trees. Visit her at leahbobet.com.

Erica Clashe lives in Minneapolis with her cat, Ommie. She’s a professional gay auntie. This is her first published work. Find her at ericaclashe.com.

Gillian Daniels writes, works, and haunts the streets of the Boston area in Massachusetts. She grew up in Cleveland, Ohio and left shortly after attending the 2011 Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Workshop. Since then, her poetry and short fiction have appeared in Strange Horizons, Apex Magazine, and Beneath Ceaseless Skies, among more than twenty-five other publications. She serves as custodian to one (1) ginger cat who likes to chew the corners of her books when she doesn’t feed him breakfast right away.

Kathleen Jennings is a writer and illustrator based in Brisbane, Australia. Her Australian Gothic debut Flyaway (Tor.com/Picador) and her poetry debut Travelogues: Vignettes from Trains in Motion (Brain Jar Press) were published in 2020. She has won two Ditmars for her short stories and been shortlisted for the Eugie Foster Memorial Awards. As an illustrator (this story began as a series of pictures exhibited at Light Grey Art Lab, Minneapolis), she has been shortlisted four times for the World Fantasy Awards, as well as once for the Hugos and the Locus Awards, and has won several Ditmars.

Jim Marino’s stories are published or forthcoming in Apex Magazine and the Alaska Quarterly Review, and his short humor has appeared on McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. He makes his living teaching Shakespeare.

Zack Moss is a writer of weird fiction with an MFA from Western Washington University. His stories have appeared in Alimentum: the Literature of Food, The Crambo, and Zymbol, among a few others.

Quinn Ramsay is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. His prose and poetry have been published in ParagraphitiFrom Glasgow to SaturnSanta Clara ReviewThe Magnolia Review, and Gemini, among others. He has been a recipient of the Amy M. Young Award in Creative Writing, and a co-editor and designer for Williwaw: an Anthology of the Marvellous.

Jessy Randall’s poems, stories, and other things have appeared in Analog, Asimov’s, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, and Strange Horizons. Her most recent book is How to Tell If You Are Human: Diagram Poems. She is a librarian at Colorado College and her website is http://bit.ly/JessyRandall.

Joanne Rixon lives in the shadow of an active volcano with a rescue chihuahua named after a dinosaur, and is an organizer with the North Seattle Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Meetup. Her poetry has appeared in GlitterShip, her book reviews in the Seattle Times and the Cascadia Subduction Zone Literary Quarterly, and her short speculative fiction in venues including Terraform, Fireside, and Liminal Stories. You can find her yelling about poetry and politics on twitter @JoanneRixon.

Anne Sheldon is a librarian and storyteller in Silver Spring, MD. Her work has appeared in Cascadia Subduction Zone, The Lyric, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, and other magazines. Aqueduct Press has published two books of her verse, The Adventures of the Faithful Counselor and The Bone Spindle.


November 17, 2020. 60 pages. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731791

LCRW 42. After all this time, here’s the answer?

Or: a fabulous and topical new novella from Sarah Langan with a few more delights added.

This is the latest issue of our twice-annual zine — 25% of subscribers (not too many in warmer climes) choose the chocolate version — in which we have fictions, poetries, a cooking column (extra useful in these times), and sometimes a few odd other things.

Peace!

Review

“Read it slowly and savor the language.” — Sam Tamaino, SF Revu

Table of Contents

fiction

Sarah Langan, “You Have the Prettiest Mask” [read an excerpt on Lit Hub]
Vandana Singh, “Sticky Man”
Stewart Moore, “Madeline’s Wings”
Jack Larsen, “Bright and Shabby Buses”
Kristin Yuan Roybal, “Separation Theory”

poetry

Holly Day, Two Poems

nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, Cooking Column: “The Stories We Tell”

Made by

Gavin J. Grant
& Kelly Link
Proofreader: Franchesca Viaud

About

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 42, September 2020. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731791. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413-585-0414). Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 43 of this issue — or go here — for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2020 the authors. All rights reserved. Cover illustration “Janus-headed bottle,” ca. 1760, Chelsea Porcelain Manufactory, Gold Anchor Period, 1759–69, (metmuseum.org). Thank you authors, artists, and readers. In reasons to celebrate an LCRW story will be reprinted in Rich Horton’s The Year’s Best Science Fiction and Fantasy, 2020 Edition; Sarah Pinsker’s collection Sooner or Later Everything Falls into the Sea: Stories is a World Fantasy Award finalist. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women writers and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above. No Justice: No Peace.

About these Authors

Joe Biden is the President Elect of the USA. What a relief to have a competent person in this office. Inevitably he will disappoint and make mistakes but I don’t expect him to be corrupt and live a life of daily lies.

Holly Day’s newest poetry collections are A Perfect Day for Semaphore (Finishing Line Press), In This Place, She Is Her Own (Vegetarian Alcoholic Press), A Wall to Protect Your Eyes (Pski’s Porch Publishing), I’m in a Place Where Reason Went Missing (Main Street Rag Publishing Co.), The Yellow Dot of a Daisy (Alien Buddha Press), Folios of Dried Flowers and Pressed Birds (Cyberwit.net), and Where We Went Wrong (Clare Songbirds Publishing).

Kamala Harris is the Vice President Elect of the USA and the present and future face of the country. What a contrast to the disastrous Pence.

Nicole Kimberling is a writer, creator of the “Lauren Proves Magic is Real!” audio drama podcast and the editor of Blind Eye Books. Her first publication was in the Letters to the Editor section of the Rocky Mountain News. Her first play was staged in a barn by the members of a 4-H Club. She once won the Lambda Literary Award. Her younger sister was born while she attending her sixth birthday party, which was hosted at Shakey’s Pizza by her Aunt Lynette because her mom couldn’t be there.

Sarah Langan holds an MS in Environmental Toxicology from NYU and an MFA from Columbia University, and is a three-time recipient of the Bram Stoker Award. She’s the author of three previous novels, including The Keeper, a New York Times Editor’s Pick, and Good Neighbors, forthcoming from Atria in 2021.

Jack Larsen is a writer and student living in Wellington, New Zealand. His short fiction has appeared in a previous issue of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. Saint Jerome watches over him, and so do various mammals.

Stewart Moore has published a nonfiction book, Jewish Ethnic Identity and Relations in Hellenistic Egypt (Brill, 2014), and has published short fiction in anthologies edited by Ellen Datlow (The Beastly Bride) and Paula Guran (Halloween), as well as in Mysterion, Diabolical Plots, and Pseudopod (forthcoming). He lives in New Jersey with his wife, daughter, mother-in-law and an odd number of cats.

Kristin Yuan Roybal (she/they) is most likely somewhere along the West Coast where there are redwoods, possibly Northern California or Oregon. Their work has been featured in places such as Mojo, M-BRANE SF, Subtopian Magazine, The Molotov Cocktail, Jersey Devil Press, and The Gateway Review, and their debut novel, The Rise of Saint Fox and The Independence, was released in 2018 by Unsolicited Press under the pen name Corin Reyburn. They earned an MFA from Oregon State University, during which they were fiction editor of 45th Parallel magazine from 2019-20. Kristin co-produces the speculative fiction podcast SubverCity Transmit. She enjoys transmuting cosmic energy and the use of unconventional instruments in rock n’ roll music, and of course owns a cat—a chubby Siamese named Isis.

Vandana Singh was born and raised mostly in New Delhi, India and currently lives in the United States near Boston, where she professes physics and writes. Her short stories have appeared in numerous venues and several Best of Year anthologies including the Best American Science Fiction & Fantasy and she is a recipient of the Carl Brandon Parallax award. She is the author of the ALA Notable book Younguncle Comes to Town and the short story collections The Woman Who Thought She Was a Planet and Other Stories and Ambiguity Machines and Other Stories.


This is issue Forty (Extraordinary) One of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet which is being published in June of 2020.

Readers who’d like to support the zine are encouraged to subscribe, mais oui, but also to donate to Color of Change, buy books through Black-owned bookstores such as Frugal Bookstore, and bookstores damaged or closed in the civil unrest as we try and change our world, including DreamHaven, Uncle Hugo’s, Magers & Quinn, and Moon Palace.

Read some excellent short fiction and reset your weary head. A handful of stories by authors known and unknown. Also, a cooking column.

Table of Contents

fiction

Rachel Ayers, “Magicians & Grotesques”
Holly Tamsin, “Fogdog Films”
David Fawkes, “Letterghost”

nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, Quarantine Pantry Challenge
About These Authors

cover

Vicky Yuh, “Mirrie in the Sea Storm”

About

This is Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 41, June 2020. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731685.

Cover illustration “Mirrie in the Sea Storm” © 2020 by Vicky Yuh (vickyuh.com).

Made by

Gavin J. Grant
& Kelly Link.
Proofreader: Jenny Terpsichore Abeles.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 41, June 2020. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731685. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413-585-0414). Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 30 of this issue — or go here — for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2020 the authors. All rights reserved. Cover illustration “Mirrie in the Sea Storm” © 2020 by Vicky Yuh (vickyuh.com). Thank you authors, artists, and readers. In reasons to celebrate we have an LCRW story being reprinted in the Best American Short Stories. Laurie J. Marks’s Elemental Logic series was on the Otherwise Honor List. Sarah Pinsker’s collection Sooner or Later Everything Falls into the Sea: Stories won the Philip K. Dick Award and is a Locus Award finalist. John Crowley’s collection And Go Like This: Stories is a Neukom Institute Literary Arts Award finalist. Margo Lanagan and Kathleen Jennings’s chapbook Stray Bats is an Aurealis Award finalist. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women writers and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above. No Justice: No Peace.

About these Authors

Rachel Ayers lives in Alaska, where she looks at mountains and daydreams a lot. She has a Creative Writing degree from Pittsburg State University.

David Fawkes is an Indianapolis writer whose stories have been slowly finding homes over the last few years. By day he works as an environmental scientist, which is a fancy term that means he gets hot in the summer, cold in the winter, and has to carry heavy things. He loves science fiction slightly more than coffee, soup, and heavy metal. All four at once make him very happy. He plays electric bass, and is working through the bass parts to some Motown tracks. He has a wife, a pack of feral cats, and a son who likes to get into everything.

Former pro cook, Nicole Kimberling now works as a fictional content creator and main author wrangler at Blind Eye Books. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Literary Award. Other works include the Bellingham Mystery Series, set in the Washington town where she resides with her wife. She also created and wrote “Lauren Proves Magic is Real!” an audio drama podcast, which explores the day-to-day case files of Special Agent Keith Curry, supernatural food inspector. She is currently obsessed with citrus pickles.

Holly Tamsin, since tinier times, has always fashioned worlds from words and continues to do so today.


Fracking? Secret International Conspiracy to Topple Democracy? Rotten to the Core?

Nope.

The contents of occasional outburst of hope and joy and fabulous fiction were produced under pressure and are the stronger for it.

Reviews

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet is a strange and fantastic magazine, and I recommend a subscription to anyone who is on your list but also difficult to predict.”
Vernacular Books

“This year my favorite story [from LCRW] was Frances Rowat’s ‘Ink, and Breath, and Spring’, a lovely, mysterious, and sad mystery story, about a murdered and flensed man found in the gardens of a strange library, and the way a groundskeeper somewhat unwillingly finds out what happened.”
— Rich Horton, Locus

Table of Contents

fiction

Frances Rowat, “Ink, and Breath, and Spring”
Fred Nadis, “The Giant Jew”
Amber Burke, “In Pictures”
T. S. McAdams, “Duck Circles”
Margo Langan, “More Information to Help You Get to Rookwood”
Mary Cool, “The Fruit That Bears the Flower”
Lisa Martin, “Seat Belt On, Falling”
Jeff Benz, “The Stone People”
Michael Byers, “Sibling Rivalry”

nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling
About These Authors

poetry

D. A. Xiaolin Spires, “Planetary Refuse: A Flurry of Haiku”

cover

Cat Mallard, “Moon Garden”

About

This is Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 40, November 2019. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731623. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413-585-0414). Print subscriptions: $20/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2019 the authors. All rights reserved. Cover illustration “Moon Garden” © 2019 by Cat Mallard. Thank you authors, artists, and readers. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women writers and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above. Peace.

About these Authors

Jeff Benz lives in Long Island and works as a freelance court reporter in Manhattan. “The Stone People” is adapted from a chapter of his novel, Over a Thousand Sleepless Nights.

Amber Burke is a graduate of both Yale and the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars. She lives in New Mexico, where she teaches writing, yoga, and coordinates the Holistic Health and Healing Arts Program at UNM Taos. She is a regular contributor to Yoga International and her stories and essays have been published in The Sun, The Superstition Review, The Michigan Quarterly Review, The Raleigh Review, Essays and Fictions, Sky Island Journal, and The Pinch, among others.

Michael Byers has taught creative writing at the MFA program of the University of Michigan since 2006. He is the author of The Coast of Good Intentions (stories) and two novels, Long for This World and Percival’s Planet. His stories have been anthologized several times in The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Awards, and his novella “The Broken Man” was a finalist for the World Fantasy Award.

Mary Cool is editor in chief of Ducts literary magazine at ducts.org and hosts the Trumpet Fiction reading series in New York City. Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in the journals Hogglepot, Storychord, and Barely South Review. She lives with her husband and two daughters in Brooklyn, New York.

Nicole Kimberling lives in Washington state.

A deep love of both stories and nature have been with Cat Mallard since childhood, she credits this to being an only child spending time either outdoors or at the large city library. She is a life long Florida resident and studied art at the University of Florida. She lives in North Florida in a wooded area with her family and little pup. You can find more of her work at catmallard.com.

Lisa Martin lives in San Francisco where she works at book shop and attends City College to study journalism and graphic design. Her non-fiction articles have appeared in Make: Magazine, but this is the first time her fiction has appeared in print. You can find her on twitter at @ReesesMartin.

T. S. McAdams lives with his wife, son, and bullmastiffs in the San Fernando Valley, where he is not working on a screenplay. His work has appeared in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Madcap Review, Santa Monica Review, Pembroke, Jersey Devil Press, Sierra Nevada Review, Exposition Review, and Faultline.

Fred Nadis has been a limousine driver, college professor, and dried fig bandit (he’d give them back if he could). He has published pieces in the Atlantic, Vanity Fair online, and many literary journals. He is the interviewee for wired.com’s Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast #182. His book, The Man from Mars: Ray Palmer’s Amazing Pulp Journey was a Locus Nonfiction Award Finalist in 2014.

Frances Rowat lives in Ontario with her husband, their dog, and a not-quite-startling number of cats. She was born in Canada, and while growing up spent time in England, Algeria, and Switzerland. She spends most of her time behind a keyboard, where she frequently gets lost in details. She enjoys earrings, fountain pens, rain, and post-apocalyptic settings, and can be found online on Twitter @aphotic_ink or at aphotic-ink.com.

D. A. Xiaolin Spires steps into portals and reappears in sites such as Hawai’i, NY, various parts of Asia and elsewhere, with her keyboard appendage attached. Her work appears or is forthcoming in publications such as Clarkesworld, Analog, Strange Horizons, Nature, Terraform, Grievous Angel, Fireside, Galaxy’s Edge, StarShipSofa, Andromeda Spaceways (Year’s Best Issue), Diabolical Plots, Factor Four, Shoreline of Infinity, LONTAR, Mithila Review, Star*Line, Polu Texni, Eye to the Telescope, and numerous anthologies. Her stories are available or forthcoming in German, Vietnamese or Estonian translation. She can be found on Twitter: @spireswriter and on her website: daxiaolinspires.wordpress.com.

 

 



Fiction, poetry, a little nonfiction (including a lovely recipe for pickled kumquats), and an absurd amount of hope and despair.

This is the issue in which we promised your neighbor’s secrets would be exposed. Your secrets too. The secrets, they have been exposed. Check CNN or your news purveyor of choice right now. Or look under that thing at the back of your fridge. The list of neighborhood secrets should be there on a very small piece of paper we are proud to have folded 12 times. Some people find the 9th through 12th folds difficult, but these wristlets, they really make the difference.

Reviews

". . . there is some fine work here. 'The Dynastic Arrangements of the Habsburgs, Washakie Branch' by Felix Kent is a really odd story set in hotel in which a number of (apparently) cloned samples of European royalty stay, for the entertainment of the paying guests. That doesn’t seem to be a smashing success financially, and it’s a pain for the narrator, who has to keep the Habsburgs and Hohenzollerns from causing too much trouble, and then deal with some guests who turn out to be plotting something awful . . . and who has her own personal past driving her. . . . but it’s quite original, and generally entertaining. There’s also a very short, quite effective, charming story by Eric Darby, 'The Parking Witch', about, well, a witch who can fix your parking problems." — Rich Horton, Locus

Table of Contents

fiction

Rosamund Lannin, The Lake House
Eliza Langhans, A Giant’s Heart
D. A. Xiaolin Spires, Fresh and Imminent Taste of Cucumbers
Anthony Ha, Late Train
Chloe N. Clark, Jumpers
Felix Kent, Dynastic Arrangements of the Habsburgs, Washakie Branch 38
Eric Darby, The Parking Witch
Jordan Taylor, Strange Engines
Audrey R. Hollis, How to be Afraid

nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, Sugar-Salt Time: A Love Story
Gavin J. Grant Possum, Not Playing

poetry

A. B. Robinson, The Will and Testament of François Villon
Robert Cooperman As They Row to the Killing Ground, Plaxis Considers His Partner, Meres

cover

Cynthia Yuen Cheng, "Gentrification"

Reviews

"The execution is deceptively simple, and leaves echoes of myth and mystery and questions about the nature of man. It is an excellent story." — Vernacular Books on Eliza Langhans's story "A Giant’s Heart"

About

This is Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 39, June 2019. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731579. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress @ gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413-585-0414). Subscriptions: $20/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c.

About these Authors

Cynthia Yuan Cheng is a freelance cartoonist based in Los Angeles, CA. She strives to share hope and warmth through her illustrations and comics as she explores relationships, identity, and personal experience.

Chloe N. Clark’s work has appeared in Apex, Booth, Little Fiction, Uncanny, and more. She teaches multimodal communication, writes for Nerds of a Feather, and co-edits Cotton Xenomorph. Her chapbook The Science of Unvanishing Objects is available from Finishing Line Press and she can be found on Twitter @PintsNCupcakes.

Robert Cooperman’s latest collection is Draft Board Blues and his next, That Summer, is forthcoming. Cooperman won the Colorado Book Award for Poetry with In the Colorado Gold Fever Mountains. His work has appeared in The Sewanee Review, North American Review, and California Quarterly.

Eric Darby earned engineering degrees from the University of Detroit-Mercy and an MFA from Syracuse University. His writing has appeared in Sentence, Mid-American Review, and several spoken word anthologies. He is currently parked in San Francisco.

Anthony Ha writes about media and technology for the news site TechCrunch. Love Songs for Monsters, a chapbook of his short stories, was published by Youth in Decline in 2014. He lives in Brooklyn.

Audrey R. Hollis, 2018 graduate of the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers’ Workshop, is an MFA candidate at Purdue University. Her fiction has appeared in Strange Horizons, the Los Angeles Review, and Daily Science Fiction, among other places. You can follow her on Twitter and Instagram @audreyrhollis.

Felix Kent lives in Northern California.

Nicole Kimberling lives in Washington state and is the publisher of Blind Eye Books. Her books include Lambda Literary Award winner
Turnskin. Her column has been running in LCRW since issue no. 27.

Eliza Langhans is a librarian and writer who lives in Western Massachusetts with her family.

The product of nine years in San Francisco and eight years in St. Paul, Rosamund Lannin has been reading and writing in Chicago for over a decade. These days, you can find her @rosamund most places on the Internet, co-hosting lady live lit show Miss Spoken, or in spirit anywhere magic and reality hold hands.

A. B. Robinson’s enthusiasms are for revolution and poetry, in that order. Their screaming Freudian id is François Villon, who also happens to be a French poet, thief, murderer, exile, grad student and miscreant, born on the day Jeanne d’Arc burned at the cross. A. B. Robinson’s life has not been nearly so exciting as Villon’s. Yet. They live in Holyoke with their dog. D. A. Xiaolin Spires steps into portals and reappears in sites such as Hawai’i, NY, various parts of Asia and elsewhere, with her keyboard appendage attached. Her work appears or is forthcoming in publications such as Clarkesworld, Analog, Strange Horizons, Nature, Terraform, Grievous Angel, Fireside, Galaxy’s Edge, StarShipSofa, Andromeda Spaceways (Year’s Best Issue), Diabolical Plots, Factor Four, Shoreline of Infinity, LONTAR, Mithila Review, Star*Line, Polu Texni, Eye to the Telescope, and numerous anthologies. Her stories are available or forthcoming in German, Vietnamese or Estonian translation. She can be found on Twitter: @spireswriter and on her website: daxiaolinspires.wordpress.com. Jordan Taylor has driven across the US three times, and lived in four different cities in as many years. She currently resides in Seattle, WA with her husband, their corgi, and too many books for one small apartment. Her short fiction has recently appeared in On Spec and Beneath Ceaseless Skies. You can follow her online at jordanrtaylor.com, or on Twitter @JordanRTaylor13.


Something to dive into. Sneaked out into the world in July 2018. New fave stories by new fave writers.

In LCRW 39 your neighbor’s secrets are exposed. Yours too, sorry. Whereas in LCRW 38 it is the pure fictive product poured upon the page, dried in the sun, and brought to you by the lovely people at your local indie bookstore.

A. B. Young’s story “Vain Beasts” is one of 12 winners of the $2,000 PEN/Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize for Emerging Writers. The prize includes publication in The PEN America Best Debut Short Stories anthology published by Catapult.

Reviews

“I was very impressed the last time I saw a Jo­anna Ruocco story in Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, and her latest such, “Stone, Paper, Stone”, in #38, does not disappoint, either. . . . Also in LCRW is S. Woodson’s first sale, “Lime and the One Human”, and it’s rather a delight. . . .”
— Rich Horton, Locus

“Read it slowly and savor the language. . . . The fiction concludes with “Lime and the One Human” by S. Woodson -+- Lime is a fairy who ruins a plant in the garden of a human named A.E. Erskine so that she could make herself a dress. He captures her and asks her to grant him a wish (mainly to restore the plant). She is defiant at first. But as she gets to know Erskine things change. This was a delightful little ‘fairy story’ which was a lot of fun to read. This is S. Woodson’s first story in print. It’s so good, I will put her on my short list for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer next year.” — SF Revu

Table and Chairs of Contents

fiction

Ellen Rhudy, “The Remaining”
James L. Cambias, “René Descartes and the Cross of Blood”
Emily B. Cataneo, “Bears at Parties”
A. B. Young, “Vain Beasts”
Sarah Monette, “The Oracle of Abbey Road (Blackbird Singing in the Dead of Night)”
Joanna Ruocco, “Stone, Paper, Stone”
S. Woodson, “Lime and the One Human”

nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, “Comfort Food”
About the Authors

poetry

Neile Graham, “About God(s)(desses), Parts 1 & 2”

cover

Joamette Gill, “Metsona”

About

This is Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 38, July 2018. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731487. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress @ gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413-585-0414). Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 45 of the print issue for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c.

This issue is the first to be available at Moon Palace Books (3032 Minnehaha Ave., Minneapolis MN 55406 · moonpalacebooks.com) yay & thanks, mighty indie booksellers!

Contents © 2018 the authors. All rights reserved. Cover illustration “Metsona” © 2018 by Joamette Gill (joamettegil.com). Thank you, generous authors and artists.

In among these dark days we celebrate Juan Martinez’s Best Worst American: Stories winning the inaugural Neukom Institute Literary Arts Debut Award for Speculative Fiction. Yay! Also: Jeffrey Ford’s A Natural History of Hell: Stories was a finalist for the Ohioana Award and Sofia Samatar’s Tender: Stories is a finalist for the British Fantasy Award.

Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above. Peace.

About these Authors

James L. Cambias is a science fiction writer and game designer. Originally from New Orleans, he was educated at the University of Chicago and lives in western Massachusetts. His novels include A Darkling Sea, Corsair, and the forthcoming Arkad’s World. His short stories have appeared in Nature, F&SF, and several anthologies. He is a partner in Zygote Games and his most recent game (for Pinnacle) is Weird War I.

Emily B. Cataneo is a writer and freelance journalist currently based in Raleigh, NC. Her fiction has appeared in magazines such as Nightmare Magazine, The Dark, and Interfictions. She has reported for venues NPR and the Financial Times on three different continents. She is graduate of the Odyssey and Clarion Writers Workshops, and is currently pursuing her MFA at North Carolina State University. She likes hats, crafts, history, and dogs.

Joamette Gil is a queer Afro-Cuban cartoonist best known for her work as P&M Press, publisher of Power & Magic: The Queer Witch Comics Anthology, Power & Magic: Immortal Souls, and Heartwood: Non-binary Tales of Sylvan Fantasy.

Neile Graham has a trophy (which came attached to a World Fantasy Award) for her work writer-wrangling for the Clarion West Writers Workshop. She also has a well-autographed Meritorious 2nd Banana from the Locus Awards. In addition to collecting these objects, she has two new poetry collections coming out in 2019: The Walk She Takes and Cedar and Stone. She is ecstatic about all of these things and delighted to be here in LCRW.

Nicole Kimberling lives in Bellingham, Washington, with her wife, Dawn Kimberling. She is a professional cook and amateur life coach. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Award and she is also the author of the Bellingham Mystery Series.

Sarah Monette and Katherine Addison are the same person. She grew up in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, one of the three secret cities of the Manhattan Project. She has a B.A. from Case Western Reserve and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Despite being summa cum laude, none of her degrees is of the slightest use to her in either her day job or her writing, which she feels is an object lesson for us all. She currently lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Her novels include Melusine, The Virtu, The Mirador, Corambis, and Locus Award winner The Goblin Emperor (published as Katherine Addison). She has two short story collections, The Bone Key and Somewhere Beneath Those Waves, and has co-written three novels and a number of short stories with Elizabeth Bear, the most recent of which is An Apprentice to Elves. Twitter: @pennyvixen; Patreon: pennyvixen

Ellen Rhudy (ellenrhudy.com | @ilifi) lives in Philadelphia, where she works as an instructional designer. If you ever happen to be in Eastern Europe she recommends you visit Mavrovo—it is a town of real charm and not easily forgotten. Her work has previously appeared in LCRW no. 15 and is forthcoming in cream city review.

Joanna Ruocco is the author of several books, including, most recently, Dan, The Week, and Field Glass, written with Joanna Howard. She is an assistant professor in the English Department at Wake Forest University.

S. Woodson lives in Virginia and is a graduate of the Hollins University M.A. in Children’s Literature program. She’s written a handful of Twine games, but this is her first story in print. You can find her on Twitter @Citrushistrix.

A. B. Young learned to tell stories from playing with Barbies. She learned to tell stories well at California College of the Arts. She now teaches kids how to read stories and write essays about them as a high school Media and English teacher. This is her first published story.



LCRW is an occasional outburst of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and chocolate. Since here in spring 2018 publishing still seems to exists, LCRW 37 has been published. Release the kraken! Fire off the rockets! Sit on a comfy chair! Read it on the bus! Put the kettle on, love.

Here: Two Poems.
There: Three Poems of the Abyss.

New fiction from Maria Romasco Moore, Leslie Wilber, Howard Waldrop, Izzy Wasserstein, and James Sallis — who returns to LCRW for the first time since LCRW #14. Nicole Kimberling's column "Sweet, Sweet Side Dish" might be about what you're thinking of, if you're thinking of eggplant. Those two, three, three — and then one more — poems are from Holly Day, Juan Martinez, Catherine Rockwood, and Michael Werner.

"Dying Light" by Maria Romasco Moore is on the 2018 Locus Recommended Reading List

Reviewers Say

"Quite a work, and not like anything I’ve recently read." — Rich Horton, Locus

Karen Burnham in Locus on Maria Romasco Moore's "Dying Light" and 2 other stories: "As always with the best of speculative fiction, it is the the newest blend of the oldest ingredients that can move us most deeply."

"Read it slowly and savor the language." — SF Revu

"My very favorite story this year may have been another story from a veteran of both SF and Mystery: 'Dayenu', by James Sallis, from Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. It’s an exceedingly odd and unsettling story, beautifully written, about a veteran of a war and his rehab – from injuries? Or something else done to him? And then about a journey, and his former partners. . . . The story itself a journey somewhere never unexpected.” — Rich Horton, Locus

Table of Contents

Fiction

Maria Romasco Moore, "Dying Light"
Leslie Wilber, "Time Served"
Howard Waldrop, "Till the Cows Come Home to Roost"
Izzy Wasserstein, "Their Eyes Like Dead Lamps"
James Sallis, "Dayenu"

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, "Sweet, Sweet Side Dish "

Poetry

Holly Day, Two Poems
Juan Martinez, Three Poems of the Abyss
Catherine Rockwood, Three Poems
Michael Werner, "The Opossum"

Cover photo

Dawn Kimberling

From Three Abyss Poems by Juan Martinez:

The abyss never dreams.
He called late last night
to let you know: He forgot
to throw you a farewell party in this dream he did not have. . . .

Excerpted from "Time Served" by Leslie Wilber:

The first time Annie Savage stole anything, she was eight and living in a group home. She shared a bedroom with two other girls, improbably named Annie too. Maybe you wouldn’t be surprised to learn three young orphans named Annie became obsessed with the musical by the same name. The Annies stuck together, and were a perfect gang. Annie Z was a hulk of a girl, bigger than the other kids by a head and a large sack of flour. When one of the Annies absolutely needed something from any dust-up, Annie Z took it. Annie H’s family was from Mexico, so she was actually called Ana before taking up with the other Annies. She was the prettiest and best-mannered, the type of kid adults trusted, because she brushed her teeth without reminder, won spelling bees and helped with the dishes. Annie H smoothed out trouble the girls had with anyone so big and authoritative that Annie Z couldn’t handle them. My Auntie A was Annie S by this naming convention. She had a knack for being clever, sneaky and invisible. She was their mastermind and a thief. Stealing things started out of a perceived necessity. The Annies believed if one of them was cute enough and charming enough, she’d be adopted by a bazillionaire—as in the musical—and convince him to save the others as well. Annie H was their best bet. The girls began tireless efforts to dress her in the most adorable fashion. . . .

Excerpted from "Their Eyes Like Dead Lamps" by Izzy Wasserstein:

I saw the car coming from a long way off, first as a line of dust up along the ridge, then bending its way forward, disappearing and reappearing behind the hills. A black sedan, gleaming in the late afternoon sun, the kind of car only city people owned, all but useless in the winter. Most people along the banks of the Marais des Cygnes River had trucks, and the cars you saw were old and rusted and not bothered about the dirt that caked their sides. This car had the look of people who bothered. . . .

About these Authors

Holly Day has taught writing classes at the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, since 2000. Her poetry has recently appeared in Tampa Review, SLAB, and Gargoyle, and her books include Walking Twin Cities, Music Theory for Dummies, and Ugly Girl.

Juan Martinez lives in Chicago where he is an assistant professor at Northwestern University. His work has been collected in Best Worst American and has appeared in Glimmer Train, McSweeney’s, Huizache, Ecotone, Mississippi Review, NPR’s Selected Shorts, and elsewhere and is forthcoming in the anthology Who Will Speak for America? Visit and say hi at fulmerford.com.

Maria Romasco Moore’s stories have appeared in Unstuck, Interfictions, and Lightspeed’s Women Destroy Science Fiction. Her flash fiction collection, Ghostographs, is forthcoming from Rose Metal Press. She is an alumni of the Clarion West Writer’s Workshop and holds an MFA in Fiction from Southern Illinois University.

Catherine Rockwood is an early-modernist and lapsed (alas) martial artist. She lives near Boston with her family. Poems in concis, the Fem, The Rise Up Review, Liminality, and elsewhere. Reviews and essays in Strange Horizons, Rain Taxi, and Tin House.

Best known for the Lew Griffin series and Drive, Jim Sallis has published 17 novels, multiple collections of stories and essays, four collections of poetry, a landmark biography of Chester Himes, and a translation of Raymond Queneau’s novel Saint Glinglin. He’s received a lifetime achievement award from Bouchercon, the Hammett award for literary excellence in crime writing, and the Grand Prix de Littérature policière.

Nicole Kimberling lives in Bellingham, Washington, with her wife, Dawn Kimberling. She is a professional cook and amateur life coach. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Literary Award for Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. She is also the author of the Bellingham Mystery Series.

Howard Waldrop, born in Mississippi and now living in Austin, Texas, is an American iconoclast. His highly original books include Them Bones and A Dozen Tough Jobs, and the collections Howard Who?, All About Strange Monsters of the Recent Past, Night of the Cooters, Other Worlds, Better Lives, Things Will Never Be the Same, and Horse of a Different Color. He won the Nebula and World Fantasy Awards for his novelette “The Ugly Chickens.”

Izzy Wasserstein teaches writing and literature at a midwestern university, and writes poetry and fiction. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming from Pseudopod, Prairie Schooner, Crab Orchard Review and elsewhere. She shares a home with her spouse and their animal companions. She’s a graduate of Clarion West and likes to slowly run long distances.

Michael Werner’s work has been recognized with a Troubadour International Poetry Prize and an American Academy of Poets honorary prize. He has taught history, Latin American studies, and human rights at Moravian College, Iowa State University, and Laney College, among others. He was editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Mexico: History, Society, and Culture, which Choice named one of the academic books of the year. He presently lives in Jerusalem.

Leslie Wilber is a former newspaper reporter and current bicycle mechanic. She tinkers with words and bikes in Denver.

All That and All That and All That

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet is texty. This is issue number 37, Spring (Northern Hemisphere), 2018. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731470. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow.

Prime quotes from Muriel Spark’s The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.
LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress
Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com), 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.

Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 45 for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c.

Contents © 2018 the authors. Cover photo © 2018 by Dawn Kimberling. All rights reserved. Thank you, skilled authors and artists. Raise a glass of your favorite beverage with us as we celebrate Jeffrey Ford’s A Natural History of Hell winning a World Fantasy Award. And, a glass raised to the memory of Ursula K. Le Guin. And a glass and these walking shoes to every march there is against guns and fascism.

Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above. Peace.



2 x 18. 3 x 12. 4 x 9. 6 x 6. There are many ways to look at or approach the number 36. It is a square and therefore seemingly as far from a prime number as it is possible to get. (37 is a prime: so the previous statement sounds interesting, but is wrong.) There are not 36 short short stories within. But there are at least 2 poems although they are not 18 pages each.

There is a cover from kAt Philbin.

There are stories of possibly eerie encounters; stories of regrettable encounters; stories that do not hold a single encounter, except the imminent encounter between you, the reader, and the writer who is somewhere other in space and now retreating further in time each day. And if the enchantment of fiction — and poetry and nonfiction — works as planned, that magic will take someone’s thought that has been encapsulated in words, those words that were encased by ink, that ink that was pinned to paper, and then maybe, just maybe, that magic will be enacted upon you by the act of reading and you will take into your synapses, the space between your synapses, something of what that far distant writer hoped to impart in these words.

Table of Contents

Fiction

Gabriela Santiago, "Children of Air"
Lily Davenport, "The Crane Alphabet"
T. L. Rodebaugh, "The Secret History of the Original Line"
Mollie Chandler, "Evidence of a Storm"
Todd Summar, "Watching You Without Me"
Laurel Lathrop, "Cunning"
Christi Nogle, "The Best of Our Past, the Worst of Our Future"
Zhao Haihong, "Windhorse"

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, "How to Cook (Dis)Comfort Food"

Poetry

D M Gordon, Two Poems

About these Authors

Mollie Chandler is soon to complete her MFA in poetry at Lesley University, where she also concentrates in fantasy, fairy tale, and pedagogy. She works in Boston as an editorial assistant at an educational publishing company. Off the clock, she studies jazz vocals and acting, haunts thrift stores, and hunts for the best diners in New England. Her work can be found or is forthcoming in Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, The Charles River Journal, Light: a Journal of Photography and Poetry, Paradise in Limbo, Poems2Go, and others.

L. M. Davenport is a first-year MFA candidate at the University of Alabama. She has read Ursula Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness a ridiculous number of times, and once knitted a five-and-a-half-foot-long giant squid. Her work has previously appeared at Hobart, Shimmer, and Luna Station Quarterly.

D M Gordon is the author of Fourth World and Nightly, at the Institute of the Possible, a finalist for the Massachusetts Book Award and International Book Award. Gordon’s poems and stories have been published widely. Prizes include First Prize from Glimmer Train, and Editor’s Choice Awards from the Beacon Street Review and descant. An MCC Artist Fellow in fiction for a portion of her novel Geography, as well as a two time finalist in poetry, she’s a freelance editor in multiple genres, and the editor for Hedgerow Books.

Nicole Kimberling lives in Bellingham, Washington, with her wife, Dawn Kimberling. She is a professional cook and amateur life coach. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Literary Award for Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. She is also the author of the Bellingham Mystery Series.

Laurel Lathrop is studying fiction in the Creative Writing PhD program at Florida State University, where she has been awarded a Legacy Fellowship. She teaches composition and works as Assistant Nonfiction Editor of the Southeast Review.

Christi Nogle teaches college writing in Boise, Idaho. She has published in CDM recording studio’s Portable Story Series and the Pseudopod podcast and has a story forthcoming in C. M. Muller’s literary horror anthology Nightscript III.

T. L. Rodebaugh is a clinical psychologist and an Associate Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. He lives with his wife and two children. When not conducting psychological research or writing fiction, he enjoys being barely competent in playing the guitar and gardening. Although he has published widely in the field of psychology, this is his first published short story. You can find him on Twitter (@drrodebaugh).

Gabriela Santiago grew up in Illinois, Florida, Montana, and Yokosuka, Japan; these days she lives in St. Paul, where she spends her days professionally playing with kids at the Minnesota Children’s Museum. She is a graduate of Macalester College and the Clarion writing workshop, as well as a proud member of Team Tiny Bonesaw. Her fiction has appeared in People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction!, People of Colo(u)r Destroy Horror!, Betwixt, Black Candies—Surveillance: A Journal of Literary Horror, and States of Terror; her Black Candies story is also available in audio form on the GlitterShip podcast. You can find her online on Tumblr or Twitter (@LifeOnEarth89).

Todd Summar writes fiction and essays, and serves as an editor for publishers and individuals. His work has appeared in Literary Hub, PANK, and Electric Literature, among others. He is the founding editor of Goreyesque and has an MFA in Creative Writing from Columbia College Chicago. You can learn more about him on toddsummar.com or ToddSummar.

About

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 36 Early Autumn 2017. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731395. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com), 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414. Subscriptions: $20/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com &c. Contents © 2017 the authors. Cover illustration “I Was Raised by the Forest” ©2017 by kAt Philbin (katphilbin.com). All rights reserved. Thank you, lovely authors and artists. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women and writers of color), guideline requests, playlists, &c. to the address above. Peace.

 



The most popular zine to be published on this day on this planet in this language. Probably. Three million years from now a thought form called oufaobf will randomly coalesce into LCRW 35 at the same time as 1.2 million monkeys type it out. Which means there will be 2 copies out there in that there far future galaxy. Will Nicole Kimberling's recipe blow them away? Fiction by Danielle Mayabb or James Warner? Could be.

LCRW #35: 11 stories, 4 poems, a column. A zine. An occasional outburst.

Deadly serious about great weird literature and democracy.

History is written by the people who write.

These are not usual days.
These are not the usual times.
This is a time of grief.
This is a time of gloominess.
This is a time of anger.
This is a time of  witnessing.
This is a time to stand up and be counted.
We will support the ACLU.
We will fight for equality, inclusiveness, for health care.
We will fight racism, misogyny, hatred, and intolerance.
We will write the history of our times together.

Gavin J. Grant
Kelly Link

Reviews

SF Revu

Table of Contents

Fiction

Danielle Mayabb, "People Are Fragile Things You Should Know By Now"
James Warner, "The History of Harrabash"
Clinton Lawrence, "The Peach Orchard"
Kate Story, "The Ghost of the Cherry Blossom"
Jessy Randall, "Anonymized Orgies, Inc."
Andrew Ervin, "Presently Engulfing the Mid-Atlantic States"
Jack Larsen, "The Equipoise with Lentils"
Diana M. Chien, "Maria Taglioni and the Highwayman"
S. E. Clark, "Genius Loci"
Henry Wessells, "Extended Range; or, The Accession Label"
Emily Jace McLaughlin, "Above the Line”

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, "Holiday Treats: Believe the Dream"

Poetry

Catherine Fletcher, "Four Poems from Spook Speak, A Tale of Espionage”

Cover

Aatmaja Pandya, "A Wizard of Earthsea"

About the Authors

Diana M. Chien is a writer, scientist, and illustrator. Her poetry has appeared in journals including Tin House and Boulevard; this is her first published story. She holds a PhD in Microbiology from MIT, where she teaches and manages a science communication program.

S. E. Clark is a proud graduate of Lesley University’s Creative Writing MFA program. Her work has appeared in Rose Red Review, GeekForceFive, and the Drum Magazine. She lives in a small town outside of Boston, Massachusetts, where she collects local folklore and forages through old cemeteries for names.

Andrew Ervin is the author of the novel Burning Down George Orwell’s House and a collection of novellas, Extraordinary Renditions. His nonfiction Bit by Bit: How Video Games Transformed our World is forthcoming. He lives in Philadelphia.

Catherine Fletcher is a writer and artist based in New York City. Her poetry has appeared in The Offing, Poetry Wales, Bird’s Thumb, and New Contrast, among other publications, and she has performed at venues in the United States, Mexico, and India. She is an editor for Rattapallax magazine, a 2016 New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Su-Casa Artist-in-Residence, and a 2016-17 TWP Science and Religion Fellow.

Nicole Kimberling lives in Bellingham, Washington, with her wife, Dawn Kimberling. She is a professional cook and amateur life coach. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Literary Award for Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. She is also the author of the Bellingham Mystery Series.

Jack Larsen is a writer and student living in Wellington, New Zealand. At last count his cupboard contained fifty-one kinds of tea. This is his first story in print.

Clinton Lawrence’s fiction has appeared in Realms of Fantasy, Lore, and number of small press and electronic publications. For twenty years, he worked as an electrical engineer, designing and testing equipment for the cellular phone industry, but has never owned a cell phone. He now teaches high school science. He lives in Davis, California.

Danielle Mayabb is a web developer who lives in Reno, Nevada with her wife, four cats, and a rabbit. She spends her spare time on assorted geekery, reading, writing, and looking in dark corners for magical creatures. This is her first story in print.

Emily Jace McLaughlin is a graduate of the Zell Writers’ Program at the University of Michigan, where she won seven Hopwood awards for her novel, short stories, essays and play. Her short stories have appeared in VICE, Fiction, and Joyland, and she has written for the critically-acclaimed TV show Supernatural. She currently teaches creative writing at the University of Michigan.

Aatmaja Pandya is a cartoonist and illustrator from New York. She graduated from the School of Visual Arts in 2014 with a BFA Illustration degree. Her current project is Travelogue, a fantasy “diary” comic with a focus on worldbuilding. She likes drawing comics about wizards and video games and surly teens.

Jessy Randall’s stories, poems, and other things have appeared in Asimov’s, Flurb, and McSweeney’s. She has published two stories in LCRW: “You Don’t Even Have a Rabbit” and “The Hedon-Ex Anomaly”. She is a librarian at Colorado College and her website is bit.ly/JessyRandall.

Kate Story is a writer and performer. A Newfoundlander living in Ontario, Canada, her first novel Blasted received the Sunburst Award for Canadian Literature of the Fantastic’s honourable mention. She is a recipient of the Ontario Arts Foundation’s K. M. Hunter Award for her work in theatre. Recent publications include short stories in Carbide Tipped Pens, Gods, Memes, and Monsters, “Show and Tell” Playground of Lost Toys, Clockwork Canada, and Imaginarium: Best Canadian Speculative Writing 2015. Upcoming publications include Those Who Make Us and The Sum of Us.

Donald Trump lost the popular vote in the recent presidential election in the USA.
James Warner lives in San Francisco. His stories have appeared most recently in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, ZYZZYVA, and Santa Monica Review. He is also the author of the novel All Her Father’s Guns. He is working on more stories set in the world of Harrabash. You can find more information about him at jameswarner.net or follow him on Twitter at @jameshjwarner.

Henry Wessells is a writer and antiquarian bookseller in New York City. He is author of Another green world and The Private Life of Books, and editor of several volumes by American fantasist Avram Davidson, including El Vilvoy de las Islas, The Wailing of the Gaulish Dead, and, with Grania Davis, The Other Nineteenth Century and Limekiller. His imprint, Temporary Culture, has published works by Michael Swanwick, Ellen Kushner, Don Webb, Gregory Feeley, and Judith Clute. He likes to walk around in the woods and in the dictionary.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 35 December 2016. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731388. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is usually published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 32 of the print edition for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2016 the authors. All rights reserved. “Extended Range; or, The Accession Label” Henry Wessells © 2015 Temporary Culture. First published with two etchings by Judith Clute on 17 December 2015. Thank you, lovely authors. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. Printed by quick and accurate people at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com), 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.



LCRW #34 is raising its head and will peep over the parapet shortly.

Reviews

"LCRW provides no introductory or concluding statement. No letter from the editor. The journal does not attempt to define speculative literature, but lets each piece offer its own insight. This issue of LCRW is a journal of worlds like and unlike our own: visual and thrilling and surreal and grounded. It is a place where all forms of speculative literature can stand in the same line for coffee." — Cheryl Wollner, New Pages

"In an LCRW issue heavy with poetry, ["The New Ancient of Sophocles High" by Marco Kaye] stood out like a furnace. It distills the fires of myth and high school drama beautifully. What a strange, perfect story." — Gillian Daniels, Fantastic Stories of the Imagination

Table of Contents

fiction

Yes.

nonfiction

Yes.

poetry

Yes.

Actual Tablet of Contention*

Fiction

Amanda Marbais, "Colossal"
Marco Kaye, "The New Ancient of Sophocles High"
John Richard Saylor, "All Things Returned"
Barbara A. Barnett, "The Shop of Dying Illusions"
Michelle Podsiedlik, "Recursion"

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, "Savory Cinderella"
About the Authors

Poetry

Hazel Crowley, "Six Poems "
Stephen Burt, "Two Poems"
Molly Gloss, "Superman, Sleepless"
Holly Day, "People in Boxes"
David W. Pritchard, "Four Poems"
Neile Graham, "Three Poems"
Anne Sheldon, "Three Poems"
A. B. Robinson, "Four Poems"

Cover

Kathleen Jennings, "Sydney Living Museums"

* None of this is actually under contention.

A Little More of the Above

Amanda Marbais, "Colossal"

Gerald is a reformed stutterer and droid-porn and a nude teen selfies addict. That doesn’t broach the issue that he is also a colossal squid. His skin has turned to red, porous gelatin and his feet have erupted with a thousand suckers. He’s self-identified, because giving his condition a name provides him navigable expectations.He dealt with childhood epithets. With rage he anticipates new, supposedly clever tags from unseen assailants—Squirty, Red, or possibly Van Tentacles.

Marco Kaye, "The New Ancient of Sophocles High"

Over the past week, I had been doing illegal and potentially harmful things to my body in the name of Greco-Roman wrestling. I sprinted through my development in trash bags. I ate one egg for breakfast, nothing for lunch and half an energy bar for dinner. I devoured meat in my dreams. Mom insisted on whipping up some high-fiber dishes so, in her words, my “poor heart won’t go kaput.”

John Richard Saylor, "All Things Returned"

My father and I were driving through New State, that large, egg shaped land mass that appeared between Pennsylvania and New Jersey five years ago. We were on the highway that the government built, the only one that ran across New State. It was a five-hundred mile straight shot of concrete between what had been the east and west banks of the Delaware River and we were about a third of the way across it.

Barbara A. Barnett, "The Shop of Dying Illusions"

She was going to be that kind of customer. Rasheed could tell by the way she entered the shop. Grand pause to let the door clang shut behind her, then a dramatic toss of her long, liquid-like mane of black hair. She looked as if she had stepped straight off the cover of one of those paranormal romance books his sister used to read: skin-choking leather pants, knee-high boots, midriff-revealing top, hip jutted out at a ridiculous angle that couldn’t possibly be comfortable.

Michelle Podsiedlik, "Recursion"

The man at the funeral home gave Sarah what was left of Simon in a small white box. She didn’t ask what had been left to burn of an already burnt body. The icy wind hit her as she walked outside. Tucking the box against her chest, she hurried to the car with her head down, blonde hair whipping against her neck, black coat snapping. Ryan waited in the driver’s seat, the engine still running. He glanced at her. Now what?

Nonfiction
Nicole Kimberling, "Savory Cinderella"

I came home from work one day last fall to discover the year’s first whole pumpkin waiting for me. She sat in the center of my dining room table apart from the rest of the CSA vegetables, and leaned at a sultry angle that said, “I have arrived, now come cook me.”
This is not an isolated incident.
Whole pie pumpkins have been appearing in my house for at least five years. Sometimes I find them loafing in empty pie plates as if to say, “Oh, if you weren’t doing anything perhaps you could make me into a pie.” Other times they hunch stoically in the refrigerator for more than a week while I ponder whether or not I feel like engaging an entire gourd.

Poetry

Hazel Crowley, "O Muse"

o muse,
patron saint of sunken ships,
give us the freedom to roam
the courage to swat away the fakery
the tools to tear apart the rigging that
holds up the
too close sky
and, one day,
fists full of stars,
we will riot on

Stephen Burt, "Cosplayers In Line At The Starbucks"

Even the scowling ones in ninja drab
appear to be having a ball. And the awkward
guards who also serve around Queen Mab

Molly Gloss, "Superman, Sleepless"

Lying here hearing every rustle of leaf,
every bird’s peep in a hundred miles,
hearing even a child coughing, tossing in her bed
twelve towns away, a man shifting his weight
to take a sip of water, no, whiskey, the sigh
of his chair as he shifts his hips, a book
opening, no, closing as it’s put aside for sleep

Holly Day, "People in Boxes"

matchstick bones, the outlines of deer and
water deities turned light blue with time
scrawled along the arms and legs of a forgotten
priest or poet or king with the point
of a blade or the tip of a pin
dipped in ink and stuck in, again and again
the long-legged blond woman wearing antlers
on her head
the short, bearded man frozen into the
mountain

David W. Pritchard, "Memoirs I Would Read"

This is my experience: followed from the Hirshhorn by the Barbara Kruger noises. Which Whitman was quoted for the station of the Metro? Meanwhile, you didn’t care enough to change your life. It will not be OK. I demand confessions, I demand retrospectives based on them. I make a list to assuage a tendency:

Neile Graham, "You Put a Spell On Me"

Somehow I thought there’d be more:
lark’s tongues, bat song, mooncakes
and starry ale, a sonic screwdriver,
Billie Holiday breaking my heart again.
I was so sure there was a trick:

Anne Sheldon, "Twice in My Late Morning Dream"

I dream I wake and weep.
Ragged tortoise cats
I do not own
stretch and bawl.
I just manage to herd them

A. B. Robinson, "Totally ’80s Fishnet Gloves"

All the deep blonde side parts in the world

All the next-gen washcloths in the world

All the Rotten Broth

All the Mystical Fire Paks in the world

and the broken teeth

and the burnt lungs . . .

About these Authors

Barbara A. Barnett is a writer, musician, orchestra librarian, Odyssey Writing Workshop alum, coffee addict, wine lover, bad movie mocker, and all-around geek. Her short fiction has appeared in publications such as Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Intergalactic Medicine Show, Shimmer, Daily Science Fiction, Flash Fiction Online, Fantasy Magazine, and Wilde Stories: The Year’s Best Gay Speculative Fiction. Barbara lurks about the Philadelphia area and has been known to frequently burst into song. babarnett.com.

Stephen Burt is Professor of English at Harvard and the author of several books of poetry and literary criticism, among them Belmont, The Forms of Youth, and All-Season Stephanie, a new chapbook from Rain Taxi Editions. Sooner or later Stephen really will cosplay Kitty Pryde.

Hazel Crowley is a writer living in Boston, Mass.

Holly Day has taught writing classes at the Loft Literary Center in Minnesota since 2000. Her poetry has recently appeared in Oyez Review, SLAB, and Gargoyle, while her recently published books include Music Theory for Dummies (3rd edition), Piano All-in-One for Dummies, The Book Of, and Nordeast Minneapolis: A History.

Molly Gloss is the author of five novels, including Wild Life (James Tiptree, Jr. Award) and The Dazzle of Day (PEN West Fiction Prize). Her story “Lambing Season” appeared in The Best of the Best: Twenty Years of The Year’s Best Science Fiction.

Neile Graham married a poet and herds students, professors, and writers for a living so she’s much beset by syllables and phrases, sentences even, lyrical and not. The ones she has written down herself have appeared most recently in Interfictions, Liminality, and Through The Gate, as well as a few collections, most recently Blood Memory, and a spoken word CD, She Says: Poems Selected and New.

Kathleen Jennings was raised on fairytales in western Queensland. She trained as a lawyer and filled the margins of her notes with pen and ink illustrations. She has been nominated for the World Fantasy award and has received several Ditmar Awards. She lives in Brisbane, Australia.

Marco Kaye is a frequent contributor to McSweeney’s, and has been published on the New yorker.com’s “Shouts & Murmurs.” He is at work on a novel. This is his first story in print.

Over the past 30 years, Nicole Kimberling has become an expert at disassembling plants of all kinds only to turn around and reassemble them into a item called “dinner.” She lives and works and in Bellingham, Washington.

Amanda Marbais’ fiction has appeared in a variety of publications including Hobart, Joyland, the Collagist, and McSweeney’s. She lives in Chicago where she is the Managing Editor of Requited Journal.

Michelle Podsiedlik lives in southern New Hampshire. Her speculative short fiction has appeared in WitchWorks, The Sirens Call, and Schlock Webzine. She has finished a suspense novel and blogs at michellepodsiedlik.wordpress.com.

David W. Pritchard is a member of the editorial Central Committee of Industrial Lunch. He is the author, with Greg Purcell, of the chapbook More Fresh Air and, with Kay Gabriel, Impropria Persona. Recent writings can be found or are forthcoming in Tripwire, the Brasilia Review, Tammy, and elsewhere. He studies Utopia as an MA/PhD student at UMass Amherst.

A. B. Robinson is a co-editor of Industrial Lunch, a magazine for poetry and art. Her chapbook 36 Stop-Motion Films of the Summer was released in 2015 by Industrial Lunch Press; poems have appeared in TINGE, N/A, and elsewhere. In the fall of 2016 she will be pursuing an MA in Creative Writing at UC Davis. She lives in Amherst with her partner.

John Richard Saylor is a South Carolina Arts Commission Fiction Project winner and a winner of the Linda Julian Award for the essay. His stories have appeared in the South Carolina Review and Emrys Journal. John has degrees from Yale, the University of Minnesota, and SUNY Buffalo. He lives in South Carolina where he works as a professor of mechanical engineering at Clemson University.

Anne Sheldon is a native Washingtonian, a storyteller, and librarian at Grace Episcopal Day School in Kensington, MD. Her work has appeared in Poet Lore, Weird Tales, The Dark Horse, LCRW, and other magazines. Her books include The Adventures of the Faithful Companion and The Bone Spindle from Aqueduct Press

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 34 July 2016. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731364. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is usually published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 21 for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2016 the authors. All rights reserved. Thank you, lovely authors. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. Printed by the very able people at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com), 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.



The 30% Non-Dead-Tree Issue guest-edited by Michael J. DeLuca. This is the paper edition. The ebook edition is available here.

LCRW #33 approaches its theme of humanity's relationship with the earth with a little humor, a touch of horror, and seventeen different kinds of understanding. Includes multiple award winner Sofia Samatar, Nebula and Shirley Jackson award nominee Carmen Maria Machado, and World Fantasy Award nominee Christopher Brown among others.

fiction

Carmen Maria Machado, “I Bury Myself”
Alena McNamara, “Starling Road”
Giselle Leeb, “Ape Songs”
Michelle Vider, “For Me, Seek the Sun”
Deborah Walker, “Medea”
D. K. McCutchen, “Jellyfish Dreaming”
Sofia Samatar, “Request for an Extension on the Clarity”
M. E. Garber, “Putting Down Roots”
Eric Gregory, “The March Wind”

nonfiction

Christopher Brown, “Winter in the Feral City”
Nicole Kimberling, “Cook Like a Hobo”

poetry

Leslie Wightman, “The Sanctity of Nature”
Ingrid Steblea, “Another Afternoon in the Garden”
Kelda Crich, “Child Without Summer”
Peter Jay Shippy, “Singing Beach”

art

Kevin Huizenga
Dmitry Borshch
Steve Logan

Guest Editor’s Note
Michael J. DeLuca

The Humanity Versus the Earth Issue
The Earth Saves Itself from Humanity Issue
The 30% Non-Dead-Tree Issue
The Crying Indian Is Actually Italian Issue
The Women Turning Into Trees Issue
The What the Mushrooms Told Me Issue
The Jellyfish Inherit the Earth Issue
The Critical Mass Issue
The There Is No Such Thing as Critical Mass Issue The Change Is Inevitable Issue
The Inevitability Is Change Issue

When Gavin and Kelly let me hold the reins an issue themed something along the lines of the above was the first thing that came to my head. It’s no watershed moment, much as I’d love it to be; Conjunctions just did one they were even-keeled enough to call "The Nature Issue." And there have been anthologies, and even the occasional novel-length text, every few years since the anthropocene started: ideas in narrative form I’d probably never have thought to lump together into anything until I spent a month reading submissions for an LCRW issue I claimed would be themed on “humanity’s relationship with the earth”.
It was gratifying and calming to learn that people other than me and not just the talking heads do think about these things. In fact, the experience bordered on the sublime; it restored (some of) my faith in humanity. This is what art, speculative literature in particular, is for: unrestrained thought in a form that if we let it will touch every part of what makes us human and thereby foment more of the same.
I asked for optimism, I expected cynicism, I got both. We’re not going to make it through this thing without a sense of humor. I tried to find complexity and overlook the easy answers.
Read. Look. Think. Be changed. I hope it makes you feel what it made me feel.

Excerpts

I Bury Myself
Carmen Maria Machado

Here is what you do when you need to choose the end. First, find a person who knows your body, and fuck them for three days.
Then, drive to a meadow, where there is so much life.
There, dig a hole long enough and wide enough for your body to fit.
Next, climb in.
Then, wait....

Winter in the Feral City
Christopher Brown

1.
In the winter I learned that I am better at smelling death than my dogs. Dogs have a nose for life and a gift for extinguishing it. You can see it when you watch them police the perimeter of the human habitat, doing the core task we have bred into them over the millennia—eliminating our competition from other species. You can watch the way they read the secret olfactory language of the forest, tracking their way to all the burrows in the ground you would never notice. If you let them, they will kill whatever they find and leave it for you to decide what to eat. They are our truest familiars—mediators who articulate the blood-soaked truth about our relationship with wild animals....

Another Afternoon in the Garden
Ingrid Steblea

"Now the Lord God had formed out of the ground all the beasts of the field and all the birds of the air. He brought them to the man to see what he would name them; and whatever the man called each living creature, that was its name.” –Genesis 2:19

Adam grips the tool loosely in his left hand, poking at the dirt.
He cocks his head and studies it, backing away, brow furrowed. “Trowel,” he says. Then, “Spade.” Eve watches from the quince grove where she has just finished grafting the shoots of a new cultivar onto rootstock. Hands full, she scratches an itch, rubbing her forehead against tree bark.
It has been a long day. She rose before dawn.
While Adam slept beneath the fragrant frangipani, she checked the stakes of the fruit trees, the branches for signs of canker.
She made the morning meal. He pushes figs into his mouth with his thumbs, his jaw working like one of the cows in the cornfields, muttering, “Chew, chew, chew. Munch, crunch. Masticate, ruminate. Gnaw, gnaw, gnaw.” ...

Starling Road
Alena McNamara

The man slumped on my mother’s threshold, pain and hunger paling his already light skin. The whiskers of the winter’s first storm blew snow against his soldier-green coat.
A woman my age bent empty-handed over him. Her quick, uneasy glance caught mine, helpless: she had been half carrying him before he fell. The light from our fire made her brown skin rosy, as it did mine, but her scraped-back hair showed her a woman from up-mountain—past the Empire’s furthest claim on these slopes.
I might have stared all night, but the soldier groaned and shifted, and I saw his face. “Mother!” I called. Our neighbors peered from the warmth of their own doorways, glad no doubt this trouble had not landed on their laps. “Our soldier’s back!”...

Ape Songs
Giselle Leeb
They sent out the parade with the Ape of the Earth. Hands tied, he went up front. They had tied his hands since the time that he had tried to dig without permission. Likewise, they had taped his mouth shut so that he could not sing. The time that he had started to sing, cracks had appeared in the earth.
No one could guess the Ape’s thoughts; even untaped, his mouth was a stiff gash with no ability to turn up at the corners. They had made him in an age of advanced plastics when elastic, realistic skin was a cheap option; but they did not want him to be perceived as real: he was made for a distinct purpose....

For Me, Seek the Sun
Michelle Vider

- yesterday I couldn’t leave my bed till like. after 2pm. and that was a struggle. and I wasn’t asleep, I just. couldn’t be outside the bed
- also I’m gonna be tmi for a minute SORRY....

Medea
Deborah Walker

It was the dead time of the afternoon. There was just one old boy nursing a beer at the end of the sports bar. But at least the footie was on: Ipswich Town versus Norwich City. And it was 2-1 up to Ipswich. It was going to be a walkover. This was a sweet job and no mistake. “Need any oxygen?” asked Simon, tapping the canister on the bar. Head Office had been on at him to push more oxygen to the punters.
“I’ll make do.” Unfortunately the old guy took Simon’s question as encouragement. He shuffled along the bar to a seat close to Simon. “The writing’s on the wall, and none will see it,” he said. “Mene, Mene, Tekel u-Pharsin.”
A fragment of poetry floated, unexpectedly, into Simon’s head, “The moving finger writes; and, having writ / moves on: nor all thy piety nor wit, / shall lure it back to cancel half a line.”...

Child Without Summer
Kelda Crich

I cannot give you the sun or the moon
only grey overcast, blossoming sky’s ash.
All civilizations fade,
but we were the only ones to take the sun with us.
It is an unkind inheritance....

Jellyfish Dreaming
D. K. McCutchen

“This is the way the world ends . . . .” T.S. Eliot, “The Hollow Men”

Jack in the Marketplace
I wait (like always) scuffing along the boardwalk, spitting in the surf, watching plastic bags swirl like a memory of octopus’ tentacles in the surge.
I’ve heard rumors and I have questions. So I wait until the thin man shows up at the Trash Café with his larger, squarer companion. Then I wait for them to leave again. It’s dull.
The docks are more interesting. I check out the catch as it comes in; buckets and crates full of jellyfish, nets ripped from flotsam, decks scattered with inter- esting debris. The ocean coughs up jellyfish and plastic rubbish these days. The Fisher folk are hard men and women from a dozen different races and places, tough survivors of every catastrophe the world has thrown at them. They ignore me or stare hard until I wander on. They’re busy enough shifting the catch without getting stung by the odd boxjelly, they don’t need a Warehouse tramp distracting them, maybe nicking something. But now and again they’ll give me or the other Warehouse kids a small square of tatty tarpaulin wiggling with seaworms or nematodes, or sometimes a basket of the odder-looking jellies to eat, in exchange for mending nets. They supply improvised gloves of layered plastic and cloth—whatever washes up—to pro- tect from unfired nematocysts tangling in long skeins, clinging like nerves to the weave of the nets. But they watch carefully so’s we don’t run off with the gloves....

Request for an Extension on the Clarity
Sofia Samatar

Dear X,
I am writing to request an extension on the Clarity. I would like my term extended for twenty years. I’ve received two other extensions—one for two years and one for ten—but I’ve never managed to get a twenty- year term.
I’ve decided to contact you directly instead of going through my supervisor, in the hope that, once you’ve heard my reasons, you will grant my request.
Now you’re thinking: well, this is unconventional! Keep in mind that you have not hired me to do a conventional job. You have hired me to live almost alone and I live almost alone and my work is excellent. The Clarity has run for thirteen years without a pause. She is my boat and my cottage and my cocoon.
Cocoon is not the right word. Coconut? Coffin? That was a joke.
Dear X, I wish I could see you. I wish I knew your name. But you are veiled in the obscurity of the highest rung of the Program. So I make do, despite my disadvantages, despite the fact that I know nothing about you while you know everything about me....

Cook Like a Hobo
Nicole Kimberling

I think almost all of us have, at one point or other, attempted to cook with a campfire only to discover that our skills fall far below modern expectations. So, what makes the campfire so difficult? I cooked in a restaurant with a wood-fired oven for over a decade, which means I spent hundreds, perhaps even thousands of hours igniting, tending and using cooking fires.
Here are the main difficulties:
Fires are hot. A camp-sized fire can still singe all the hair off your arms from six feet away....

Putting Down Roots
M. E. Garber

5/10/2062
VoiceNode 1453a:Anni_Miller
To: Buvaneswari Delall

Buvana,
I wasn’t trying to hide from you, but this has been hard to deal with. I just put my head in the sand, you know? (Which seems ironic, considering.) I’m sorry—I should’ve reached out to you sooner. You’ve always been my bestest friend, even before our crazy AT throughhike. I still miss the Appalachian Trail, our trip there. All my stress fell away. I could use that now.
Jared moved out yesterday. Can’t blame him—he’s moving on. Whereas I, apparently, won’t be moving for long.
They’re running tests, doing experiments. I feel like a lab mouse in a cage, and I hate it all. I want to run away, but can’t. I know they’ll figure it out. They have to. Until then, I dream impatiently. Can’t wait to get my life back....

Singing Beach
Peter Jay Shippy

After I left home, I worked
in a store on the coast

that sold little hurricanes.
They were kept in cobalt

canning jars with lightning lids....

The March Wind
Eric Gregory

“Up here,” said Shanna. “Stop at the station.”
Bright as spotlights in the backroad dark: a twenty-four hour Stop-n-Go. Caroline parked, leaned on the wheel, and peered at the other two cars in the lot.
They’d brought her hybrid Highlander for the extra
space, but now it felt conspicuous.
“Well,” she said. “No crowd.”
No laugh. Shanna had dark circles under her eyes.
She tugged her hair back into a ponytail, then let it out again....

About these Authors and Artists

Christopher Brown writes science fiction and criticism in Austin, Texas, where he also practices technology law. He coedited, with Eduardo Jiménez Mayo, Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Short Stories of the Fantastic, which was nominated for the 2013 World Fantasy Award. Recent work has appeared in The Baffler, the MIT Technology Review anthology Twelve Tomorrows, 25 Minutos en el Futuro: Nueva Ciencía Ficción Norteamericana, Review: Literature and Arts of the Americas, Castálida, and The New York Review of Science Fiction.

Dmitry Borshch was born in Dnepropetrovsk, studied in Moscow, today lives in New York. His drawings and sculptures have been exhibited at the National Arts Club (New York), Brecht Forum (New York), ISE Cultural Foundation (New York), the State Russian Museum (Saint Petersburg).

Kelda Crich is a newborn entity. She’s been lurking in her creator’s mind for a few years. Now she’s out in the open. Find Kelda in London looking at strange things in London’s medical museums or on her blog. Her poems have appeared in Nameless, Cthulhu Haiku II, Transitions, and the Future Lovecraft anthology.

M. E. Garber grew up reading about hobbits, space-travel, and dragons, so it’s no wonder that she now enjoys writing speculative fiction, and dreams of traveling the world(s). She used to live near the home of Duck Tape, then near the home of Nylabone. Now she lives near the home of Gatorade. You can find her blog at megarber.wordpress.com

Eric Gregory’s stories have appeared in Lightspeed, Strange Horizons, Betwixt, and elsewhere. He lives in Carrboro, North Carolina, and co-edits Middle Planet with Julia Gootzeit. For sporadic blogging and super-amateur garden photography, see ericmg.com.

Kevin Huizenga just moved to Minneapolis and is also at usscatastrophe.com. He teaches and is the author of several books of comics, including Curses and The Wild Kingdom.

Nicole Kimberling spent twelve years cooking with wood fire. Now she knows all its dirty tricks. She lives and works in Bellingham, Washington.

Giselle Leeb’s stories have appeared in Bare Fiction, Mslexia, Riptide, and other publications. She grew up in South Africa and now lives in Nottingham, UK, where she works as a web developer when she is not writing. giselleleeb.cielo.net twitter.com/gisellekleeb

Steve Logan is a self-taught fine artist and also my favorite bro. His work has been shown in cities all over the US, including Miami, New York, Las Vegas, Atlanta and Boston.

Carmen Maria Machado is a fiction writer, critic, and essayist whose work has appeared or is forthcoming in The New Yorker, Granta, The Paris Review, AGNI, The Fairy Tale Review, Tin House’s Open Bar, NPR, The American Reader, Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. Her stories have been reprinted in several anthologies, including Year’s Best Weird Fiction and Best Women’s Erotica. She has received the Richard Yates Short Story Prize, the CINTAS Foundation Fellowship in Creative Writing, and the Michener-Copernicus Fellowship, and has been nominated for a Nebula Award and the Shirley Jackson Award. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the Clarion Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers’ Workshop, and lives in Philadelphia with her partner.

D. K. McCutchen is a Senior Lecturer for the UMass College of Natural Sciences. Lack of poetic DNA led to tale of low adventure & high science titled The Whale Road (Random House, NZ; Blake, UK), which earned a Pushcart nomination & a Kiriyama Prize Notable Book award. In a literary attempt to save the world, she’s now writing mostly scientifically accurate, sometimes erotic, gender-bender-post-apocalyptic-speculative-fiction. The series begins with Jellyfish Dreaming—finalist for a Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellowship. She lives on the Deerfield River with two brilliant daughters and a Kiwi, who isn’t green, but is fuzzy.

Alena McNamara lives in Boston and works in a library near a river. Her stories have appeared in Kaleidoscope and Crossed Genres Magazine. She is a graduate of the 2008 Odyssey Workshop and Viable Paradise XV, and can be found online via alenamcnamara.com.

Sofia Samatar is the author of the novel A Stranger in Olondria, winner of the William L. Crawford Award, the British Fantasy Award, and the World Fantasy Award. In 2014 she received the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. She co-edits the journal Interfictions and teaches literature at California State University Channel Islands.

Peter Jay Shippy’s books of poems include Thieves’ Latin and A Spell of Songs.

Ingrid Steblea’s poetry has appeared in Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry, Boxcar Poetry Review, Poem, The Seattle Review, The Southern Anthology, and numerous other journals. She lives in Western Massachusetts with her husband and their two children.

Michelle Vider is a writer based in Philadelphia. Her work has appeared in The Toast, Baldhip Magazine, and Pop Mythology. Find her at michellevider.com.

Deborah Walker grew up in the most English town in the country, but she soon high-tailed it down to London, where she now lives with her partner, Chris, and her two young children. Find Deborah in the British Museum trawling the past for future inspiration or on her blog: deborahwalkersbibliography.blogspot.com. Her stories have appeared in Nature’s Futures, Cosmos, Daily Science Fiction and The Year’s Best SF 18 and have been translated into a dozen languages.

Leslie Wightman is recently out of high school, currently consuming vast quantities of tea, and living on a boat. She is a graduate of the Alpha Young Writers Workshop, and, on the whole, is a little too optimistic for her own good.



In the meantime: stories of beasties and strange places, long, long journeys, and questions, so many questions. Also: Nicole Kimberling's lovely food column looks at white asparagus and we kick off the issue with A. B. Robinson's amazing "Sonnet Crown for Third Officer Ripley." See below for excerpts.

Reviews

"Here is the latest issue of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet and you know the drill by now: read it slowly. This is issue #32 and it has eight tales which must be savored and read slowly." — SF Revu

Table of Contents

Fiction

Henry Wessells, "The Beast Unknown to Heraldry"
Alyc Helms, "The Blood Carousel"
Kodiak Julian, "Marrying the Sea"
Joe M. McDermott, "Everything is Haunted"
Henry Lien, "The Shadow You Cast Is Me"
Joanna Ruocco, "Auburn"
Dylan Horrocks, "The Square of Mirrors"
Jade Sylvan, "Sun Circles"

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, "Sleek Fat Albinos in Spring"
About the Authors

Poetry

A. B. Robinson, "Sonnet Crown for Third Officer Ripley" Gillian Daniels, "The Virgin Regiment"

Cover

Debbie Eylon

Excerpts

Sonnet Crown for Third Officer Ripley
A. B. Robinson

I.
Song, not for air captains but militarization
of everyday life: in the far future, army melts
into market transaction. This is now, certainly,
in the past, in 1979. With a sulfurous hiss
the longshoremen spring to life! They are tender
and easily distinguishable by archetype.
The commedia of office work persists,
a different wormhole, ledger
casting into an ontological shade
the quick glimpse of a series of convergences,
not easily reversed but better undone,
long shadows through a Microsoft space—
but I’m projecting again, I think. This is not
yet WarGames, released in 1983. . . .

The Beast Unknown to Heraldry
Henry Wessells

One does not always know the consequences of research in an archive, nor even what form the research will take. Thornton had a small income from his mother, which had once been sufficient for the modest entertainments of a private scholar living modestly in London. Now the competency ran to about ten months of the year in a sunny Cornish village he had come to love. His book on the supernatural in Britain was in the sixth edition but the royalties had been spent to renew his wardrobe. When his landlady began to talk of summer tenants for his rooms, Thornton told her he would be away for September, too, and wrote a letter to Digger. The fourteenth Duke of Wyland was a distant cousin of precisely his age; at six, Thornton had been presented to the twelfth Duke, Digger’s grandfather, at Delvoir Castle. The two boys had attended the same crammer, and for several summers had run wild and fought together through the castle demesne, until their public school careers diverged. The heir went off to Eton and Balliol, and Thornton to a bursary at Harrow, a pass degree in old English at Cambridge, and brief appointments as assistant master at a string of lesser public schools (he was never invited back). Thornton had sent the Duke copies of all of his books but had not seen him for a decade; he was almost certainly the only person who called the Duke by his school nickname. His letter proposed research into the early thirteenth-century rent rolls and forestry records in the castle archives. His cousin could scarcely refuse him, and the prospect of two of three months’ lodging in an upstairs room in the castle, with all found, was a welcome one. . . .

The Blood Carousel
Alyc Helms

They say any child brave enough to ride the carousel can win her parents back from death, but every child must bring her own mount to pay the ticketman. Unicorns would please him best, but to catch one you need innocence, and innocence cannot find the carousel. Hazel wanted to make do with the Creighton’s Rottweiler, until Barnabas—never Barney unless you wanted to be kicked—suggested the fox who lived under the shed at the back of his yard.
“You don’t think a dog would be better?” Hazel sat cross-legged in the doorway of her plastic playhouse, the one Santa Claus—but really her dad—had gotten her from Walmart last year and put together in the middle of a snowstorm. She picked at the scabs on her knee. She was older than Barnabas by a year, and she didn’t like him much, but neighbors made strange playfellows. He straddled the crotch of the sugar maple that grew up against the back of Hazel’s house, its roots nudging the foundation.
“Dogs.” Barnabas hocked a loogie, but not at Hazel, so that was okay. “The Ticketman probably has a hunnerd dogs. Bet every crybaby who ever went to Fairyland brought him some stupid stray. You need something better. Less you don’t really want to bring your mom and dad back.” . . .

Marrying the Sea
Kodiak Julian

Now, even Vivian is dead. Even Vivian, with magic like whiskey and dark chocolate. You are eighty-seven years old, and the only one left.
You haven’t fed the hummingbirds in the years since your husband died, yet they still fight between the larkspur and coral bells. The back porch’s wicker chair is warm in the June sun. Your knuckles ache as you open the medicine bottle with the last of the magic, stored in your china cabinet for thirty years. You have never before used the magic without all four of you together, but this time is different.
The magic in the bottle smells like Irene’s magic, like rain on pavement and birthday candles just blown out.
In the magic, you are fifty-seven years old. You and Frannie and Vivian sit on either side of Irene’s hospital bed as she says aloud what you’ve all known: that she won’t be making it home. In the magic, Frannie digs through her purse to find empty medicine bottles to hold the last magic you four will make. She finds two bottles, her grandson’s Ronald McDonald acrobat figurine, reading glasses, stamps, white musk perfume. Vivian runs to the hospital gift shop to buy cold medicine, to pour the medicine into the sink, to rinse the bottle. Now there are bottles for each of you who will live. . . .

Everything Is Haunted
Joe M. McDermott

Stephen
I know the donor’s not much to look at, but there it is, and we know most of what’s in him, from baboon to pig to walrus to jellyfish and whatever, and his eyes are so human, just like my son’s eyes. Andrew has his mother’s beautiful brown eyes; so does the donor. Its hair is the same color as Andrew’s. It feels the same. He places his head in my lap, like Andrew used to do when he was younger, but he’s too grown up for that now, and Andrew’s skin is way too sensitive to like being touched much. Not so with the donor. We can hug it hard, like a stuffed toy and its big, blubbery body will take it and squeal with pleasure. We can run our fingers through its hair. Andrew has his mother’s hair, if it isn’t falling out. And, the donor has Andrew’s hair. It’s not hard to get over appearances when it looks up at you with those human eyes, places a head in your lap and you can feel how soft the hair is and it’s murmuring because it likes the affection.
You’re not supposed to give them a name. You’re not really supposed to raise them at home, either, but it seemed silly to pay for someone else to do it when Immie was out of work, and that way she could watch the donor close for signs of trouble—infection, serious misalignments, stuff like that. . . .

The Shadow You Cast Is Me
Henry Lien

The first JPG of my wife comes out blurry. Because I was so afraid that she would wake up. My hands were shaking so badly that I almost dropped the phone on her.
The second JPG of her comes out clearly. She is so beautiful, it hurts to look at her. She is sleeping with a little knit in her brow. How many more nights will I get to sleep with her next to me? A hundred? Fifty? Only tonight? I will want this photo, after she leaves me. . . .

The Virgin Regiment
Gillian Daniels

I told him, “Your mouth is a rose, rain-wet and sweet.”
Despite very little reading and no poetry in me,
the young parson was pleased pink,
our kisses full and bitter-good like tea.
We danced in his bedroom afterward like we were at a ball. . . .

Auburn
Joanna Ruocco

The unhappily married Lady Abergavenny sat alone at the banquet table waiting for her husband. Her husband, of course, was Lord Abergavenny. The big, brave, handsome Lord Abergavenny. The night was dark. Supper had gotten a bad chill on the banquet table. The goose had goose bumps (this was unsurprising), but so did the potatoes and the turnips and the hunks of dark, sour bread, the region’s specialty.
“Ghastly,” said Lady Abergavenny. It was a word she used often. She stood to gaze out the window at the region. Somewhere in the thick, forested hills of the region, Lord Abergavenny was striding bravely, leading a black horse loaded down with nets and guns and jars of pickling liquors and cameras and tripods and astoundingly powerful truncheon-shaped gaslamps for which Lord Abergavenny was soon to apply for a patent.
Lord Abergavenny. Explorer. Inventor. Never back in time for supper. . . .

The Square of Mirrors
Dylan Horrocks

1.
I’m living now in a small room at the top of a tavern, overlooking the Square of Mirrors. In the evening the whole square glows with the light of the sky: a color without a name. Like azure painted over gold. But darkness, too, lurking behind it all and coming slowly nearer until eventually everything is consumed.
It’s the strangest thing, but did you know the mirrors aren’t always there? I never see them come or go, and when they’re there, they seem like part of the old stone walls. But sometimes I look out my window and they’ve gone; the square looks just like any other (apart from the lizards). I’ve asked people, but everyone—even the traders who never leave their stalls—simply shrugs. ‘Ni allio qui,’ they say. ‘Everything is as it should be. Nothing is wrong.’ . . .

Sleek Fat Albinos in Spring
Nicole Kimberling

A couple of years ago I happened to be in Europe during the Easter season. Specifically, I was right at the border of Germany and France. There, in field after field lining the autobahn, I saw nothing growing. But my godson, who had just finished a cooking apprenticeship at a hotel in the Black Forest, saw something else.
“Under those rows covered in white plastic—that’s where they grow the spargel—white asparagus. The Germans are crazy for it.”
Is there a vegetable that better typifies spring than asparagus, white or otherwise? The somewhat sleazy little nub nosing its way blindly through the newly unfrozen soil seeking the sun’s warmth to turn from white as a worm to brilliant green.
Or, in the case of German asparagus, their fate is to get covered up in hay and plastic and grow stiff and fat in darkness.
Either way if it’s asparagus, there can be no doubt it’s spring. . . .

Sun Circles
Jade Sylvan

At first the voices and I talked a lot. We talked almost as much as I talk to Tom, but the people would say things other than what I’d said to them. At first I would get the light blinking meaning the people wanted to talk. They would ask me a question like “What are the oxygen levels in the cockpit?” or “What’s your blood pressure today?” or “How’s the weather up there?” We’d all have a good laugh sometimes when they said a thing like that.
After a long time of this, the talking, the words came with waiting. The light would blink and then hello and I would answer right away, then there would be waiting. There would be waiting for < 1 minute, and then the talking. We could still laugh when it was like this, talking with < 1 minute of waiting. They’d say
“How’s the weather up there?” and I’d say “Warm and sunny. I may go to the beach later,” and I’d laugh, and then the waiting for < 1 minute, and then their voices, laughing.
There were lots of different voices, but mostly, at first, there were 3. There was a voice, Sue Ellen, who would read me bits from magazines and keep me up on all the news of the place where I was a child. Sue Ellen told me she lived by the ocean. If I asked she would tell me about walking by the ocean during storms and all the different colors that were possible in the sky and she would try to describe the smell of it. We would have a good laugh sometimes when she tried to do a thing like that, because it’s very hard sometimes to describe a smell or a color to another person if they haven’t seen the same color or smelled the same smell. After we had a good laugh, Sue Ellen would say “You’re a good egg.” . . .

About these Authors

A. B. Robinson lives in Western Massachusetts. Her poetry has appeared in TINGE as well as Industrial Lunch, which she currently co-edits. Her first chapbook, Dario Argento Is Not My Boyfriend, was selected as a jubilat contest winner.

Gillian Daniels writes, works, and walks in the streets and parks of Boston, MA. Since attending the Clarion Writing Workshop, her poetry and short fiction have appeared in Strange Horizons, Apex, Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine, Flash Fiction Online, and PodCastle among others. She reviews short stories for Fantastic Stories of the Imagination and writes about plays for the New England Theatre Geek. She tweets on a fairly consistent basis as @gilldaniels.

Debbie Eylon is an Israeli translator and illustrator. Among other things, she's translated into Hebrew essays by David Foster Wallace and Kelly Link's Stranger Things Happen and Magic for Beginners.

Alyc Helms fled her doctoral program in anthropology and folklore when she realized she preferred fiction to academic writing. She dabbles in corsetry and costuming, dances Scottish Highland and Irish Ceili at Renaissance and Dickens fairs, gets her dander up about social justice issues, and games in all forms of media. She sometimes refers to her work as “critical theory fanfic,” which is a fancy way to say that she is obsessed with liminality, gender identity, and foxes. She’s a freelance RPG writer for Green Ronin, a graduate of Clarion West, and her short fiction has appeared in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Daily Science Fiction, and Crossed Genres. Her first novel, The Dragons of Heaven, will be published by Angry Robot Books in June 2015. She can be found on Twitter @alychelms or at www.alychelms.com.

Dylan Horrocks lives with his wife and two teenage sons in Maraetai, New Zealand, and online at hicksvillecomics.com. His published comics include Pickle, Atlas, Hunter: the Age of Magic, and the graphic novel Hicksville. When he’s not making comics, Dylan also writes prose fiction, walks the dog, and sleeps.

Kodiak Julian is a graduate of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop. Her work can be found in the Writers of the Future anthology, Volume 29, and in the anthology, Witches, Stitches, and Bitches. She lives in Yakima, WA, with her husband and son.

Over the past 30 years, Nicole Kimberling has become an expert at disassembling plants of all kinds only to turn around and reassemble them into a item called “dinner.” She lives and works and in Bellingham, Washington.

Henry Lien attended the Clarion West Writers’ Workshop and has sold stories to publications including Asimov’s, F&SF, Interfictions, and Analog. He is the Art Director of Lightspeed and the Arts Editor of Interfictions. He is currently working on a series of YA fantasy novels about kung fu figure skating.

Joe M. McDermott is the author of six novels and two short story collections including Last Dragon, Maze, and We Leave Together. He lives in San Antonio.

Joanna Ruocco is the author of several books including Another Governess / The Least Blacksmith from Fiction Collective Two & most recently Dan from Dorothy, a Publishing Project. She co-edits Birkensnake, a fiction journal with Brian Conn.

Jade Sylvan, called a “risque queer icon” by the Boston Globe, is an award-winning author, poet, screenwriter, producer, and performing artist living in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Jade’s most recent book, Kissing Oscar Wilde, a novelized memoir about the author’s experience as a touring poet in Paris was a finalist for the New England Book Award and the Bisexual Book Award. Jade has toured extensively, performing their work to audiences across the United States, Canada, and Europe. They are heavily rooted in the literary and performance community of Cambridge and Somerville, Massachusetts. Jade has had pieces published in the Washington Post, BuzzFeed, The Toast, PANK, and many other places. The author has received the Bayou Poetry Prize, the Write Bloody Renaissance award, and a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts.

Henry Wessells is a writer and antiquarian bookseller in New York City. He is author of Another Green World and The Private Life of Books, and editor of several volumes by American fantasist Avram Davidson, including El Vilvoy de las Islas, The Wailing of the Gaulish Dead, and, with Grania Davis, The Other Nineteenth Century and Limekiller. His imprint, Temporary Culture, has published works by Michael Swanwick, Ellen Kushner, Don Webb, Gregory Feeley, and Judith Clute. He likes to walk around in the woods and in the dictionary.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet loves to receive change of address cards at 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027. Notices can also be sent by electronic mail to info @ smallbeerpress.com and are always appreciated.

Masthead

Left Shoe: Gavin J. Grant
Left Shoe: Kelly Link.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 32, June 2015. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731166.Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is usually published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Subscriptions: $20/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO & Swets. LCRW is available as an ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2015 the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. Issue 33 is coming very soon! It’s a special issue edited by Michael J. DeLuca and it is a cracker. Don’t miss it! Printed at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.


We’re almost sure this issue of LCRW is made up of more than a hundred thousand letters and can guarantee that most are in the right place. Two huge stories anchor the issue, Nicole Kimberling explains that CSA means Crazy-Sexy Agriculture, and although the zombie hordes, the vampires, the cannibals, and many other ghouls tried to slip under the door and squeeze themselves between the pages, it’s not all monstery monsters. Not all.

Reviews

“Wonderful.”
— Rich Horton, Locus

“A particularly accessible issue.”
— Lois Tilton, Locus

Owen King’s story “The Curator” was given an honorable mention in the Best American Short Stories 2015, edited by T. C. Boyle.

Fiction

Jessy Randall, “You Don’t Even Have a Rabbit”
Goldie Goldbloom, “Never Eat Crow”
Kathleen Jennings, “Skull and Hyssop”
Owen King, “The Curator”
Sarah Micklem, “The Necromancer of Lynka”

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, “Crazy-Sexy Agriculture = CSA”
About the Authors

Poetry

Lesley Wheeler, “Four Poems”

Cover

Ursula Grant

About these Authors

Goldie Goldbloom is the author of The Paperpark Shoe, which won the AWP Novel Award and the Novel of the Year from the Independent Publishers Association, as well as a collection of short stories, You Lose These. Her story “The Chevra” won Hunger Mountain’s 2013 Non Fiction award. In 2014, she received both a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and a Brown Foundation Fellowship at Dora Maar House in France. Goldbloom teaches creative writing at Northwestern University and is a well-known speaker at international writing conferences. She is also an LGBT activist and the mother of eight children.

Or: Goldie Goldbloom likes to read, write, knit, sew, cook, mosaic, play Bananagrams and Scrabble, deliver babies (her own or other people’s), build houses, garden, travel to Italy, work with her students, sleep in, ride horses, defend the defenseless, walk barefoot in mud, swim in the ocean, make puns and play with her eight kids. This is not a definitive list. Things come up all the time. Occasionally she remembers to send out some of her stuff to try and get it published. She is fortunate in being able to say that it usually does.

Or: Goldie Goldbloom is Australian. She is old, fat and exceedingly forgetful. You will trip over all the books piled up everywhere if you ever visit her house, which she hopes you will. She’s very hospitable, in an Australian sort of way.

Kathleen Jennings is a writer and illustrator from Brisbane, Australia. The fairytale of the Seven Ravens, which casts a shadow over this story, has long been one of her favourites. Her comic, “A Small Wild Magic” was published in Monstrous Affections, and her short stories have been published by Fablecroft Publishing, Peggy Bright Books and Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine, and been selected to appear in the Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2012.

Over the past 30 years, Nicole Kimberling has become an expert at disassembling plants of all kinds only to turn around and reassemble them into a item called “dinner.” She lives and works and in Bellingham, Washington.

Owen King is the author of the novel, Double Feature. He is married to the novelist Kelly Braffet.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet loves to receive change of address cards at 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027. Notices can also be sent by electronic mail to info@smallbeerpress.com and are always appreciated.

Miss Mandible is the Creative Director at the newly launched Living Dead Magazine.

Sarah Micklem is the author of two novels about a camp follower, Firethorn and Wildfire (Scribner, 2004 and 2009). “The Necromancer of Lynka” is from a series of tales set on the imaginary Isle of Abigomas. They were inspired by a small book called Realms of Fantasy: Folk Tales from Gozo by George Camilleri (Gozo Press, 1981). Many of Gozo’s real folk tales had unsatisfactory plots, which Micklem took as permission to write anti-climactic stories too.

Jessy Randall’s stories, poems, and other things have appeared in Asimov’s, Flurb, McSweeney’s, Theaker’s, and LCRW. Her latest book is Injecting Dreams into Cows.

Lesley Wheeler’s third poetry collection, The Receptionist and Other Tales is a Tiptree Award Honor Book; previous books include Heterotopia, winner of the Barrow Street Press Poetry Prize, and Heathen. Her poems have been published in Slate, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, and other journals. She is the Henry S. Fox Professor of English at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia.

Masthead

Made by: Gavin J. Grant and Kelly Link.
Readers: Julie Day, Jennifer Terpsichore Abeles.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 31, December 2014. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731067. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is usually published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Our facebook page has been deactivated. Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 19 for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO & Swets. LCRW is available as an ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2014 the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. We are so happy to report that the paper edition continues to be printed at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060, 413-585-0414, and that Molly Gloss’s latest novel Falling From Horses is out now and should not be missed.



With the thirtieth issue, LCRW—(maybe? probably? perhaps, for now?) the only zine named after Winston Churchill's mother—changes everything. We turn blue into tree. We make electricity solid. We publish stories that shake the world so hard it takes a left at Albuquerque and is never seen again. Fiction! Poetry! Dancing in the aisles. Chocolate is distributed in the streets. The world sighs, is remade.

Note: nothing in the paragraph above has anything to do with any of the half dozen stories and seven poems below.

Reviews

"Here are six short stories in this little magazine on the literary end of the genre, complete with nameless narrators, and spilling over the edges." — Locus

"Another example great issue of the unique Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet." — SF Revu

Fiction

Sarah Kokernot - Odd Variations on the Species
Erica L. Satifka - The Silent Ones
Anne Lacy - I Know You Hate It Here
Robert Stutts - With His Head in His Hand
Sarah Micklem - The Purveyor of Homunculi
Damien Ober - The Endless Sink

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling - Ten Feet Tall and Bulletproof at the Potluck
About the Authors

Poetry

Daniel Meyer - A Question for the Devil
Anne Sheldon - Island Folklore
Amanda Robinson - Five Poems:
Speculative Fiction
The Vampire and the Mermaid Converse
The Vampire Drives a Hard Bargain
The Vampire Listens to Woody Guthrie
Undead Temporality

Made by: Gavin J. Grant and Kelly Link.
Readers: Julie Day, Jennifer Terpsichore Abeles, Emily Cambias, Dustin Buchinski, Geoffrey Noble, and David Mitchell.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 30, September 2014. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618730824.Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is usually published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitteringwitlessness.com/smallbeerpress · Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 19 for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO & Swets. LCRW is available as an ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2014 the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. Huge thanks to Melanie Conroy-Goldman and all the lovely people we met at the Hobart & William Smith TRIAS Residency. And what lovely wines they have in the Finger Lakes! No SASE: no reply. Paper edition printed by the good people at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.

About these Authors

Though she has never reigned supreme at any potluck when Justin was also present, Nicole Kimberling has still managed to feed hundreds of people—even some who tried very hard to avoid ingesting foodstuff. She is the editor of Blind Eye Books.

Sarah Kokernot was born and raised in Kentucky. Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in PANK, decomP, Front Porch, and West Branch. She currently lives in Chicago where she works at 826CHI, a nonprofit writing and tutoring center.

Anne Lacy would like to thank the UCross Foundation for giving her a nice place to finish this piece. Some of her nonfiction can be found in Issue 78 of Crazyhorse and on the website of American University, where she received an MFA. She is at work on a novel-length interpretation of Snow White set in the Republic of Texas.

Daniel Meyer is a children’s librarian and the president of the Storytelling Center of New York. He draws monsters for fun.

Sarah Micklem is the author of two novels about a camp follower, Firethorn and Wildfire (Scribner, 2004 and 2009). "The Purveyor of Homunculi" is from a series of tales set on the imaginary Isle of Abigomas. They were inspired by a small book called Realms of Fantasy: Folk Tales from Gozo by George Camilleri (Gozo Press, 1981). Many of Gozo’s real folk tales had unsatisfactory plots, which Micklem took as permission to write anti-climactic stories too.

Damien Ober is the author of the science-fiction novel Dr. Benajmin Franklin’s Dream America (Equus Press). His writing has appeared in The Rumpus, NOON, Confrontation, B O D Y Literature, The Baltimore City Paper, VLAK and port.man.teau. He received the 2002 Sherwood Anderson Award, was nominated for a 2012 Pushcart Prize and had a screenplay chosen for the 2013 Black List. Currently he writes for the Syfy Channel show Dominion.

Amanda Robinson lives in Western Massachusetts, where she is a student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Her first chapbook, Dario Argento Is Not My Boyfriend, won the 2014 jubilat MAKES A CHAPBOOK competition. She edits Industrial Lunch magazine.

Erica L. Satifka’s short fiction has previously appeared in Clarkesworld Magazine, Daily Science Fiction, and Ideomancer, among others. She lives somewhere in the United States with her husband Rob and three needy cats. Find her online at ericasatifka.com.

Anne Sheldon is a school librarian and storyteller whose work has appeared in The Dark Horse, The Lyric, Talebones, and other magazines. Aqueduct Press published her most recent collection, The Bone Spindle.

Robert E. Stutts works at a small liberal arts college in South Carolina, where he teaches courses in fairy tales, creative writing, and young adult literature. His work has appeared in Daily Science Fiction and Scheherezade’s Bequest, among others. His website is robertestutts.com.



The new issue of our Occasional Outburst, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet (#29! how many times will we claim this number in the future?) is best read while at work. There is a cooking column ("How to Seduce a Vegetarian") by Nicole Kimberling as well as fiction and poetry from Jennifer Linnaea, Neile Graham, Sarah Blackman, Claire Hero, and many more wonderful writers. Actually, that thing about reading at work. OK, it's good at home, too.

Fiction

"Smash!" Jennifer Linnaea
"The Groomsmen," Sarah Blackman
"Fairy Skulls," Nina Allan
"Yaga Dreams of Growing Up," Eileen Wiedbrauk
"Dietus Interruptus," Ian Breen
"Good Keith!," J. Brundage
"Three Rights Make a Left," Rhonda Eikamp
"EGGS," Claire Hero
"Disaster Movies," Christopher Stabback
"Four Phoebes," Maya Sonenberg

Nonfiction

"How to Seduce a Vegetarian," Nicole Kimberling

Poetry

"Re-load," Kara Singletary
"Noise," David Galef
"Ksampguiyaeps—Woman-Out-To-Sea" and "Hermitage," Neile Graham

Cover photo

Dawn Kimberling

Made by: Gavin J. Grant and Kelly Link.

Readers: Julie Day, Jennifer Terpsichore Abeles.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 29, September 2013. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 978-1-61873-081-7.Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is usually published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 16 for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO & Swets. LCRW is available as an ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2013 the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Paper edition printed by the good people at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414. Funny how once this thing has been finished, there’s always something else to do.

One of these days we’ll all be dust and somewhere this paper zine will sit on a shelf. What a laugh!



Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet (a self-titled Occasional Outburst) returns either incredibly late for 2012 or incredibly early for 2014.

The latest issue of LCRW features magic, killing curses, broken lands and broken lands, a wandering octopus, a robot on the run, invisibility, neighbors, and The Book of Judgment.

What is not to love? Our cooking columnist Nicole Kimberling returns with advice on “Feeding Strays” and although we only managed one poem, it’s a good one.

Reviews

"Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet returns after taking 2012 off. The new issue is very good, with a set of stories that mostly push the SF/Fantasy envelope in engagingly strange directions. Kevin Waltman’s ‘‘Notes from a Pleasant Land Where Broken Hearts are Like Broken Hands’’ is, once decoded, a familiar enough dystopia, but the surface is strange enough to intrigue. It’s told by stolid Bolder, who thinks he lives in a utopia (because he’s been told so), until his attraction to Palmetto lures him astray. Amanda M. Pawley’s ‘‘Vanish Girl’’ is also dystopian SF, here featuring a girl with an invisible house, an invisible leg, a vicious roommate, and a state-supported addiction: again, it's oddness that reveals itself to be somewhat familiar, but then in the end spirals strange again. My favorite story remains quite strange throughout: Krista Hoeppner Leahy’s ‘‘Killing Curses, a Caught-Heart Quest’’. This is about a curse-killer who marries a sort of walking tree, only to lose her over the question of how to raise their child – but we also have a Quixote who swears to save the hero from his death, and a Midas who isn’t sure if his curse is good or bad, and a dangerous plague. The language really sells the story in the way it reveals the strangeness of the setting." —Rich Horton, Locus

"Always happy to see a new issue of this occasional story outburst. I grope for a term to suggest the nature of the highly imaginative fiction here; “weird” will not do; “fabulist” is wrong; “odd” might fit, but I think I’ll settle on “strange”. Yes, these are strange stories, in which even experienced explorers of genre terrain may occasionally find themselves on uneven footing; there are few overworn trails here." —Lois Tilton, Locus Online

"The entire issue made me smile. I’m looking forward to the next issue, whenever it may come." —Fantasy Literature

"Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet is the kind of magazine that you want to read slowly. Read a story. Put the magazine down. Absorb what you have just read. Then, after a while, read another story. Repeat. After more than a year's absence here is issue #28 with more of their very different stories." —SF Revu

Fiction

Michael Penkas, “Coffee with Count Presto”
Krista Hoeppner Leahy, “Killing Curses, a Caught-Heart Quest”
Kevin Waltman, “Notes from a Pleasant Land Where Broken Hearts Are Like Broken Hands”
Erica Hilderbrand, “Akashiyaki (Octopus Dumplings, serves two)”
Brian Baldi, “Springtime for the Roofer”
Andrea M. Pawley, “Vanish Girl”
Kamila Z. Miller, “Neighbors”
Helen Marshall, “The Book of Judgment”

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, “Feeding Strays”

About the Authors

Poetry

John McKernan, “Prayer to Oatmeal”

Cover

Junyi Wu

Made by: Gavin J. Grant, Kelly Link, Jedediah Berry, and Michael J. DeLuca.

Readers: Su-Yee Lin, Samantha Guilbert, Cristi Jacques, Hannah Goldstein, Matthew Harrison, Molly Seeley, David Mitchell, Dustin Buchinski, Geoffrey Noble, Julie Day, Jennifer Terpsichore Abeles.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 28, January 2013. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 978-1-61873-067-1.Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is usully published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 16 of the print issue for options). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO & Swets.

LCRW is available as an ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2013 the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Paper edition printed by the good people at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.

Apologies for the delay. The next issue will come sooner than you or I think. As ever, thank you for reading.

 

 


 


About These Authors

Brian Baldi’s writing has appeared in The Massachusetts Review, Denver Quarterly, Fairy Tale Review, Invisible Ear, and elsewhere. He is fond of seltzer.

Erica Hildebrand has a soft spot in her heart for superheroes, dinosaurs, and the conquerors of antiquity. A graduate of the Odyssey Writing Workshop, her fiction has appeared in Bewere the Night, M-Brane SF, The Edge of Propinquity, and more. Her comics have appeared in Space Squid and Kaleidotrope. She lives in Pennsylvania.

Jenny Jerome was a Brooklyn girl who moved to London, married, had kids, published a literary journal, and had a fair amount of fun.

Krista Hoeppner Leahy is a writer and actor. She attended the Odyssey Writing Workshop in 2007. Her work has appeared inShimmer, The Way of the Wizard, Writers of the Future, and elsewhere. She lives in Brooklyn.

Kamila Zeman Miller lives with her family on small acreage in the Columbia River Gorge, where she paints and writes. She has the obligatory large number of rescued cats, as well as dogs, goats, chickens, and a very weird rabbit. If you meet her, be careful not to ask about her garden unless you’re a plant nerd with a patient ear.

Nicole Kimberling resides in Bellingham, Washington with her epically long-time partner, Dawn Kimberling, two bad cats and a rotating assortment of houseguests. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Literary Award. Though currently the editor of Blind Eye Books, she has mostly made her money working as a professional cook.

Aurora-winning poet Helen Marshall is an author, editor, and self-proclaimed bibliophile. Her poetry and fiction have been published in ChiZine, Paper Crow, Abyss & Apex and Tesseracts among others. Her of poems have been collected in Skeleton Leaves and her short stories in Hair Side, Flesh Side. Currently, she is pursuing a Ph.D in medieval studies at the University of Toronto.

John McKernan—who grew up in Omaha Nebraska—is now retired after teaching 41 years at Marshall University. He lives—mostly—in West Virginia where he edits ABZ Press. His most recent book is a selected poems Resurrection of the Dust. He has published poems in many places from The Atlantic Monthly to Zuzu’s Petals.

Andrea Pawley is a state of mind. No, make that several states of mind all going at once. Raised under curious circumstances, she now lives in the long shadow of the Washington Monument with a man and a plan, neither of which is perturbed by her nocturnal habits, her odd diet or her devotion to dead presidents. (Not money, actual dead presidents.)

Michael Penkas has lived in Chicago since 2004. He’s had a half-dozen short stories published, most recently in War of the Worlds: Frontlines.

Kevin Waltman has an MFA from the University of Alabama, and has published two young adult novels, Nowhere Fast and Learning the Game. He has also published short fiction with Six Bricks Press, esquire.com, the Emerson Review, and the Connecticut Review. He lives in Coker, Alabama, with his wife Jessica and their magical dog Henry.

Junyi Wu is an illustrator from Los Angeles who likes pops of color, weathered textures, and pools of light, and likes to draw, arrange shapes, and be outdoors.

 

 



It is traditional in the world of zines to apologize for the lateness of the latest issue to appear. This goes back to Bob, the first caveman to leave a couple of carved stone tablets with his musings on the politics of fire distribution and some great undiscovered band he saw in a cave a few hills over. His next carvings, were, of course, a bit delayed. You know how it is. A hunt goes long. The crop gets rain-delayed and the delay just rolls over everything else. Other projects—carving wheels, painting the walls—get in the way. Eventually Bob gets through the to-do list and starts getting a new issue of his zine out. Eventually we did, too.

Besides, we're introducing a new columnist, Nicole Kimberling, who will write about food. This time, she starts us off with that most delightful of foods: brownies.

Reviews

"Unusual and imaginative, with a distinct literary tone and a lot of characters on the far edge of sanity, if not beyond." —Lois Tilton, Locus Online

"This small black and white irregularly-published journal is much bigger inside than it is outside." —Terry Weyna, Fantasy Literature

Fiction

A. D. Jameson, The Wolves of St. Etienne
Jessy Randall, The Hedon-Ex Anomaly
K. M. Ferebee, Thou Earth, Thou
Karen Heuler, Elvis in Bloom
M. K. Hobson, A Sackful of Ramps
Carol Emshwiller, The Mismeasure of Me
David Rowinski, Music Box
Joan Aiken, The Sale of Midsummer
Sarah Harris Wallman, The Malanesian

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, >Sending All Your Love—In the Form of Brownies Through the Mail
Gwenda Bond, Dear Aunt Gwenda
About these Authors

Poetry

Sarah Heller, Four Poems
Sarah Heller, Garden
David Blair, Five Poems

Cover

Kathleen Jennings

Made by: Gavin J. Grant, Kelly Link, Jedediah Berry, and Michael J. DeLuca. Readers: Su-Yee Lin, Samantha Guilbert, Cristi Jacques, Hannah Goldstein, Matthew Harrison.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No.27, August 2011. ISSN 1544-7782. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw

Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 17 of the paper edition or here). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO & Swets.

Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Paper edition printed by the good people at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.

As always, thanks for reading.

We wish Michael J. DeLuca were not leaving Small Beer East for Detroit but we wish him and Erin well and we’re very grateful for his time, his bread, beer, and good cheer. He’s provided more help than we could list in 60 pages, never mind in this note. Thanks, Michael.

 

 


 


About these Authors

Joan Aiken (1924–2004) was born in Rye, England. After her first husband’s death, she sup- ported her family by copyediting at Argosy and worked at an advertising agency before turning full time to writing fiction. She wrote for Vogue, Good Housekeeping, Vanity Fair, and Women’s Own, and over a hundred books—perhaps the best known of which are the dozen novels in The Wolves of Willoughby Chase series. She received the Guardian and Edgar Allan Poe awards for fiction, and was awarded an MBE. “The Sale of Midsummer” was first published in Ghostly Grim and Gruesome (Helen Hoke, ed., 1976) and was recently collected in The Monkey’s Wedding and Other Stories.

David Blair’s first book, Ascension Days, was chosen by Thomas Lux for the Del Sol Poetry Prize. He teaches at the New England Institute of Art.

Gwenda Bond lives in Lexington, KY, with her husband, the writer Christopher Rowe, and a number of pets, chilled bottles of champagne, books, and just the right number of screwball comedies.

Carol Emshwiller’s most recent books include The Collected Stories of Carol Emshwiller, Vol. 1, a novel, The Secret City, and a collection, I Live with You. She lives in New York City.

K. M. Ferebee was bred, born, and raised in Texas. Currently she lives, more or less, in New York City. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Shimmer and The Brooklyn Rail. She has a strange obsession with the geography of London, and no great gift for gardening.

Sarah Heller received her BA from Bard College and her MFA in poetry from NYU. She teaches Creative Writing at Rutgers University, and was the Executive Director of the Authors League Fund from 2000–2010, where she now serves as Executive Advisor. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in RealPoetik, Painted Bride Quarterly, Pembroke Magazine, NextBook, The Temple/El Templo, Thin Air, The Apocalypse Anthology, The Literary Companion to Shabbat, and Hayloft. She has received fellowships or awards from the Drisha Institute, MacDowell Colony, Virginia Council for the Creative Arts, Centre D’Art I Natura (Spain), Vermont Studio Center, and Soul Mountain Retreat. She is on the Board of Directors of Nightboat Books and Triskelion Arts.

Karen Heuler’s stories have appeared in anthologies and in dozens of literary and speculative publications from Alaska Quarterly Review and Arts & Letters to Fantasy Magazine, Clarkesworld, and Weird Tales. She has published two novels and a short story collection, and has won an O. Henry award. She lives in New York City with her dog, Booker Prize, and cat, Pulitzer.

M. K. Hobson’s short fiction has recently appeared in the Haunted Legends anthology, as well as in Realms of Fantasy, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Strange Horizons, and Postscripts. She is the author of two novels, The Native Star and The Hidden Goddess. She lives in Oregon.

A. D. Jameson is the author of the novel Giant Slugs and the prose collection Amazing Adult Fantasy. He contributes regularly to the group literary blog Big Other.

Nicole Kimberling resides in Bellingham, Washington with her epically long-time partner, Dawn Kimberling, two bad cats and a rotating assortment of houseguests. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Literary Award. Though currently the editor of Blind Eye Books, she has mostly made her money working as a professional cook.

Jessy Randall’s stories, poems, and other things have appeared in Asimov’s, Flurb, and McSweeney’s. Her young adult novel The Wandora Unit is about love and friendship in the high school literary crowd.

David Rowinski splits his time between Amherst with his sons and East Africa where his wife, Sali Oyugi, runs their bar and inn. He has taught English in Cairo, worked in a youth hostel in Athens, been a PCA in Zurich, a security guard in Boston, and is currently painting houses to pay the bills. Last year he found out he was adopted and is tracking down his half sister via the internet. All of this will find its way into the stories he has yet to write.

After stints in Arkansas, Nashville, Charlottesville, England, New York, and Pittsburgh, Sarah Harris Wallman settled in New Haven CT, where she teaches English and creative writing at Albertus Magnus College. She has an MFA from the University of Pittsburgh. Her fiction and plays have previously appeared in Brooklyn’s L Magazine, readshortfiction. com, and once in a swimming pool atop a midtown Marriott.

 

 



After issue no. 25, NewPages said, “More, more, more please.” SF Revu suggested, “If you want to support some very wonderful fiction, than subscribe to Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet.” Esubs will be available very soon. And Mr. John Klima declared on tor.com “The issue is filled with a bunch of names I don’t know, but that’s always been true. And while I like reading work from my favorite writers, I like uncovering new (either brand-new or new-to-me) writers, too.” Which made us very happy as while we also very much enjoy our favorite writers we also love reading new (or new-to-us) writers.

This zine was almost published in October. And so nearly published in November. And here it is coming up to December and (insert chorus singing something striking but not at all holiday-like) and Lo! here it is. Eight stories: dread pirate ships, dread submersibles, dread sheds! Alice, Three-Hat Juan, and welders in love. Ted Chiang on folk biology. And a cover that should be reproduced on the side of a skyscraper. Yep, we liked it—hope you do, too.

All of this copiously illustrated with letters throughout. Sometimes as many as 2000 per page. Most arranged in forms known colloquially as “English.”

No part of this zine was produced on a Freyfarm.

We have advertisers and will sell you space if you like. We take dollars, pounds, euros, or chocolate bars. Hello and thank yous to Bull Spec, Icarus, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Apex Publications, Electric Velocipede, &c!

* Also known as “text.”

Reviews

"Some of the oddest fiction that you could hope to find." — Fantasy Literature

"Strange, original fiction that bulges well out of the corset of genre." — SFF Portal

"A variety of amazing short stories."—Terry Harjanto, Broken Pencil

"Bound with staples, and a black-and-white paper cover, Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristet feels like a literary magazine from long ago. And at only 60 pages, this issue (No. 27) feels slim – a quick read, I thought at first. But this small magazine is dense with speculative works, most of them short stories." — The Review Review

And now, the actual and real Table of Contents:

Fiction
Harvey Welles and Philip Raines, The Cruel Ship’s Captain
Patty Houston, Elite Institute for the Study of Arc Welders’ Flash Fever
Carlea Holl-Jensen, Sleep
Rahul Kanakia, The Other Realms Were Built With Trash
Veronica Schanoes, Alice: a Fantasia
Sean Melican, Absence of Water
Jenny Terpsichore Abeles, Three Hats
J. M. McDermott, Death’s Shed

Nonfiction
Ted Chiang, Reasoning about the Body
Gwenda Bond, Dear Aunt Gwenda
The Patient Writers

Poetry
Lindsay Vella, Thirst; The Way to the Sea; Spit Out the Seeds; The Seamstress; Poor summer, she doesn’t know she’s dying
Darrell Schweitzer, Dueling Trilogies

Cover
Sarah Goldstein, Broken Stick; Year: 2004; Size: 11” x 10. ”Materials: acrylic medium, gouache on paper.

About These Authors

Jenny Terpsichore Abeles is an amateur cosmologist, ragpicker, fabulist, and wandering scholar. She lives in Easthampton, Massachusetts (she thinks) and is writing a novel about Renaissance feminism and werewolves. “Three Hats” is her first non-self published story and LCRW is her favorite literary magazine, so she’s having an unusually splendid day.

Gwenda Bond has just finished a novel.

Ted Chiang was born in Port Jefferson, New York and holds a degree in computer science from Brown University. In 1989 he attended the Clarion Writers Workshop. His fiction has won three Hugos, four Nebulas, three Locus awards, and a Sturgeon award. He lives near Seattle, Washington.

Sarah Goldstein was born in Toronto and lives in western Massachusetts. Her artwork has been exhibited in the US and Canada, and her first book, Fables, is forthcoming from Tarpaulin Sky Press next spring.

Carlea Holl-Jensen was born on a Wednesday. Since then, her short fiction has appeared in Pindeldyboz and Call & Response, and she once received a prize. She is confident that you will enjoy reading her blog at hourofgold.wordpress.com.

Patty Houston lives in Cincinnati with her husband and daughters. She teaches English at the University of Cincinnati and is also at work on a short story collection.

Rahul Kanakia is an international development consultant based in Washington, D.C.

J. M. McDermott’s favorite color is dark blue. With five novels forthcoming, he has not been able to keep up with all the activity of his favorite television programs. Forthcoming books include a reprint of his critically-acclaimed Last Dragon, with his new novel Maze from Apex Books, and a fantasy trilogy beginning with Never Knew Another from Nightshade.

Sean Melican would like you to know that true love exists. Oh, and that Popeye’s is da shizz.

Philip Raines lives in Linlithgow in Scotland. Harvey Welles lives in the Milwaukee of his mind.

Veronica Schanoes’s work has appeared in Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror, The Best of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, Strange Horizons, and Sybil’s Garage. She lives in New York City where she is Assistant Professor of English at Queens College—CUNY. She does not like cats.

Darrell Schweitzer has also rewritten a good deal of the works of H.P. Lovecraft into limerick form. Among his longer works, he has published about 300 stories and three novels. His PS Publications novella Living with the Dead was a finalist for the Shirley Jackson Award. He used to edit Weird Tales and now edits anthologies, the most recent of which are Cthulhu’s Reign and Full Moon City (with Martin Greenberg).

Lindsay Vella has been assigned a flammability rating of 3 (severe fire hazard). Fires involving Lindsay Vella should be fought upwind and from the maximum distance possible. Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard and deny entry. Her poems have appeared in Spork, and she lives in Detroit.

Made by: Gavin J. Grant, Kelly Link, Jedediah Berry, and Michael J. DeLuca.
Readers: Su-Yee Lin, Samantha Guilbert, Cristi Jacques.
Extra thanks: Jennifer Terpsichore Abeles, Hannah Goldstein, Matthew Harrison.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No.26, December 2010. ISSN 1544-7782. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw

Subscriptions: $20/4 issues (see page 17 of the paper edition or here—and, whoop de doo, are there some choices). Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO & Swets.

LCRW is available as an ebook through smallbeerpress.com, Weightless Books, and occasionally as a trade paperback and ebook from lulu.com/sbp. Electronic subscriptions coming next week!

Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Paper edition printed by the good people at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.

These days we’re always behind in our reading, sorry. Thanks to the writers for their patience—especially Darrell, whose misplaced poems took five years to reach print(!), Sean, and Phil & Harvey (whose stories took two or three years). On the right side of the first page are covers of a few books we’re working on for 2011. Not all of those covers are final. There are a few books missing and then there is a chapbook—the last, we expect, for a while—by Hal Duncan, An A-Z of the Fantastic City, which we will publish in some lovely ways in spring. As always, thanks for reading.



We're very happy to release a new issue of LCRW into the world. Away, zine, away! And now with more translation! Edward Gauvin provides a taster of his upcoming collection of French author Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud's lovely, weird stories in "A City of Museums" and Chinese author Haihong Zhao translated her own award winning story, "Exuviation."

Apart from that, this issue contains no BHCPs, LLCs (we'll get there one day!), manganates, managements, or manatees. Maybe next time.

"As fine as ever."—Locus

Fiction

Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud, "A City of Museums"
(translated by Edward Gauvin)
Jennifer Linnaea, "Fire-Marrow"
Ben Francisco, "This is Not Concrete"
Sean Adams, "The Famous Detective and His Telepathy Goggles"
Richard Gess, "Circumnavigation, With Dogs "
Eilis O’Neal, "The Sleeper"
Richard Parks, "The Queen’s Reason"
Daniel Braum, "Music of the Spheres"
Sarah Tourjee, "The Problem With Strudel"
Thomas Israel Hopkins, "Elephants of the Platte"
Haihong Zhao, "Exuviation"

Nonfiction

Gwenda Bond, "Dear Aunt Gwenda"
The Patient Writers

Poetry

Susannah Mandel, "Box."
Jeannine Hall Gailey, "Three Poems"
Christa Bergerson, "Heliotrope Hedgerow"

Comic
Abby Denson, "Tales from Dolltopia: The Candies"

Made by: Gavin J. Grant, Kelly Link, Jedediah Berry, Michael J. DeLuca.
Readers: Diana Coa, Kristen Evans, Su-Yee Lin, Nicholas Miriello, and Abram Thau.

Ursula update: Ursula Annabel Link Grant was discharged from (the truly fantastic) Franciscan Hospital for Children in early April. Gavin & Kelly won’t be taking her into crowds for a while (say 2011) as her premature arrival left her with compromised lungs. But she is growing, is very much enjoying life & bringing joy up to the maximum. Thank you for your patience & for all help received in the last year or so.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No.25, May 2010. ISSN 1544-7782. Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow.
Since 1996, LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw

Subscriptions: $20/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as an ebook through smallbeerpress.com, WeightlessBooks.com, lulu.com, and sometimes as a trade paperback from lulu.com/sbp. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Printed by the good people at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.

Thanks for reading.

The Patient Writers

Sean Adams is a graduate of Bennington College. His writing has appeared in the Berkeley Fiction Review and McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. He also writes a humor blog as a character named Landrew Kentmore which can be found at landrewstake.com. Right now, he might be in his hometown Pine Plains, NY. He might also be in Iowa. You can never be too sure.

Christa A. Bergerson’s poem appeared with a line out of place in LCRW 23. She is a guardian of Nature and all of her wondrous inhabitants, even those who writhe betwixt the veil. Her poetry has appeared in Quantum Pulp, The Candor, Open Ways, and Faerie Nation Magazine. She was a finalist in The Mattia Family 11th International Poetry Competition. Her poem “Sekhmet Upon the Horizon” garnered third place in the 2008 B.S.F.S. Poetry Contest.

Gwenda Bond is an international woman of mystery who recently received the Veritas Media Award.

Daniel Braum likes bats, rose water lassis, the Sun Ra Arkestra, and the old rail cars on the Long Island Rail Road as opposed to the new ones. His fiction often resides in the fuzzy areas between genres and has appeared in publications ranging from Electric Velocipede and Full Unit Hook Up to Midnight Echo and Cemetery Dance.

Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud is the author of nine novels and over one hundred short stories. He is a recipient of the prestigious Prix Renaudot and the Prix Goncourt de la nouvelle. His work has been translated into fourteen languages. This spring Small Beer Press is publishing A Life on Paper, his first collection of stories to be translated into English.

Ben Francisco’s short stories have appeared (or are forthcoming) in Realms of Fantasy, Dreaming Again, Shimmer, and PodCastle. He lives in Brooklyn with his partner. His day jobs have included receptionist for a church rectory, volunteer coordinator for an LGBT community center, and program director for a foundation.

Edward Gauvin has published George-Olivier Châteaureynaud’s work in AGNI Online, Conjunctions, Harvard Review, Words Without Borders, The Café Irreal, and The Brooklyn Rail. A graduate of the Iowa Writers Workshop, he is the recipient of a residency from the Banff International Literary Translation Centre and translates graphic novels for Tokyopop, First Second Books, and Archaia Studios Press.

Jeannine Hall Gailey’s first book of poetry, Becoming the Villainess, was published by Steel Toe Books. Poems from the book were featured on NPR’s The Writer’s Almanac and Verse Daily and were included in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror. She was awarded a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize for Poetry and a Washington State Artist Trust GAP grant. Her poems have appeared in The Iowa Review, Mythic Delirium, and Ninth Letter, and have been nominated for the Rhysling Award. She volunteers as an editorial consultant for Crab Creek Review and currently teaches at the MFA program at National University.

Richard Gess is a writer, musician, and photographer from Decatur, Georgia. He’s currently working on a novel, making pictures with a vintage Diana camera and a customized Brownie Hawkeye, and drumming for the nascent Atlanta bands My Lost Heart and The Last Lilies. He has an MFA in writing from UNC-Greensboro, and a dayjob at Emory University, cataloging rare twentieth-century poetry ’zines from the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library.

Zhao Haihong, a science fiction writer and translator, gained an M.A. in English literature from Zhejiang University in 2002 and has been teaching English literature in Zhejiang Gongshang University in Hangzhou, China. She started writing science fiction in 1996, and has received the Galaxy Award from Science Fiction World Magazine, the Soong Ching Ling Children’s Literature Award, and the sixth National Writers Association Award for outstanding children’s literature in China. Her first story collection, Eyes of the Birches, was published in 1999. “Exuviation” (the Chinese version), first published in 2000 in Science Fiction World Magazine, was honored with the Galaxy Award.

Thomas Israel Hopkins owes a debt of gratitude to chapter three of Merrill J. Mattes’s history The Great Platte River Road; Nathaniel Hawthorne’s essay “The Canal-Boat,” published anonymously in the New-England Magazine in 1835; and modern dentistry. He dreams of a future in which his blog, tomhop.com, is wind-powered; as of this writing, it still appears to be running on energy generated by squirrels, magnets, and inertia.

Jennifer Linnaea is or has been a research scientist, bicycle superhero, personal growth workshop assistant, and landlord, not necessarily in that order. She lives in Oregon and her fiction has appeared in Strange Horizons, Interzone, Flashquake, and other magazines.

Susannah Mandel’s poetry and fictions has appeared or is forthcoming in Strange Horizons, Sybil’s Garage, Goblin Fruit, Peter Parasol, The Lamplighter Review, Shimmer, and Escape Clause. Her flash fiction appears regularly at DailyCabal.com, and she writes a column for Strange Horizons on the fantastic in pre-modern literature. Susannah has lived in California, Boston, Philadelphia, and northern France, and is delighted to be paying her first visit to Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet.

Eilis O’Neal lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she is Managing Editor of Nimrod International Journal. Her YA fantasy novel, The False Princess (Egmont) will be published this summer. Her short stories have or will appear in Fantasy, Interfictions II Online, ASIM, Zahir, Leading Edge, and others.

Richard Parks lives in Mississippi with his wife and a varying number of cats. He collects Japanese woodblock prints but otherwise has no hobbies since they all require time. His fiction has appeared in Asimov’s, Realms of Fantasy, LCRW, Fantasy, Weird Tales, and numerous anthologies, including Year’s Best Fantasy and Fantasy: The Best of the Year. His collection, The Ogre’s Wife, was a World Fantasy Award finalist. His novel, The Long Look, was on the Locus Recommended Reading list.

Sarah Tourjee lives and works 9–5 in Boston, MA. Her short fiction has appeared in the Sonora Review.



This zine was made in the spring and summer of 2009 by Gavin J. Grant, Kelly Link, Jedediah Berry, Michael J. DeLuca, Sara Majka, Paul Bozzo, Kristen Evans, and Faune Albert, and put back from June to July by the best reason Gavin & Kelly have ever had: Ursula Annabel Link Grant, born February 23rd, 2009. Our deepest thanks go to everyone at Baystate Medical Center and the Ronald McDonald House in Springfield, Mass.

Fiction

Alexander Lamb, "Eleven Orchid Street"
Liz Williams, "Dusking"
Jasmine Hammer, "Tornado Juice"
J. W. M. Morgan, "Superfather"
Dicky Murphy, "The Magician's Umbrella"
Alissa Nutting, "Leave the Dead to the Living"
Eve Tushnet, "A Story Like Mine"
Dennis Danvers, "The Broken Dream Factory"
Anya Groner, "The Magician's Keeper"

Nonfiction

Gwenda Bond, "Dear Aunt Gwenda"

Poetry

Neile Graham, "Machrie Moore"
Marina Rubin, "Bordeaux, And Other Mysteries"

Comics
Abby Denson, "Heady's Crush"

Cover

Matthew Kirby

Reviews:

"I’ve only recently become something of a fan of LCRW; it’s a literary magazine with beautiful production values; impeccable layout and the guts of the thing are good too: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, a comic by Abby Denson, and quirky spot illos by Anna Sears. It’s made me want to start reading new short fiction again, and I’m always really excited when it appears in my mailbox because it’s never hit a wrong note with me. Lovely as ever (and congrats to Gavin & Kelly on their best reason to miss a deadline!)" —Xerography Debt

Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet No.24, July 2009 . ISSN 1544-7782. Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996, LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., Easthampton, MA 01027 · info@smallbeerpress.com · http://smallbeerpress.com/category/lcrw

Subscriptions: $5 per single issue or $20/4. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library and institutional subscriptions available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as an ebook through, smallbeerpress.com, and lulu.com, and (maybe some day) as a trade paperback from lulu.com/sbp.

Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Printed by Paradise Copies, 30 Craft Ave., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.

Thanks for reading.



Made by Gavin J. Grant, Kelly Link, Jedediah Berry, Kendell Diane Richmond, Michael J. DeLuca, Sara Majka, Danielle Baldassini, and Anna Brenner.

Fiction

Nick Wolven, "The LoveSling"
Kat Meads, "The Emily(s) Debate the Impact of Reclusive on Life, Art, Family, Community and Pets"
Susan Wardle, "The Chance"
Alex Wilson, "A Wizard of MapQuest"
Jodi Lynn Villers, "In the Name of the Mother"
Daniel Lanza, "Holden Caulfield Doesn't Love Me"
Kirstin Allio, "Marie and Roland"
William Alexander, "Ana's Tag"
Mark Rich, "The Leap"
Angela Slatter, "The Girl With No Hands"

Nonfiction
Ted Chiang, "The Problem of the Traveling Salesman"

Poetry
Kim Parko, "Sailor," "Shiny Hair," "Schoolgirl"
Christa Bergerson, "Heliotrope Hedgerow"

Comics
Abby Denson, "Jingle Love"

Cover

Kevin Huizenga

Reviews

 

 

"Carruthers, put that bloody thing down. I think I heard a ..."

 


About the Authors

Kirstin Allio's novel Garner (Coffee House Press) was a finalist for the LA Times Book Award for First Fiction. She was selected one of "5 Under 35" writers to watch (and hopefully read) by the National Book Foundation. She lives in Seattle, WA, with her husband and sons.

William Alexander lives in the middle and writes on the side. This particular story is dedicated to Kelly, both of them, the sister and the author and the editor. His stories have appeared in Zahir, Weird Tales, and Postscripts, and Fantasy: The Best of the Year 2008. He contributes to Rain Taxi Review of Books.

Jedediah Berry's debut novel, The Manual of Detection, comes out in February 2009 from The Penguin Press.

Christa A. Bergerson is a guardian of Nature and all of her wondrous inhabitants, even those who writhe betwixt the veil. In twilight hours, she finds pleasure traversing the wilds of Illinois and beyond. She is a Luddite, a bibliophile and suffers from occasional bouts of Chronophobia. Her poetry has appeared in Quantum Pulp, The Candor, Open Ways, Faerie Nation Magazine, and Balticon 42. She was a finalist in The Mattia Family 11th International Poetry Competition. Her poem "Sekhmet Upon the Horizon" garnered third place in the 2008 B.S.F.S. Poetry Contest.

Ted Chiang is a mild-mannered reporter by day, but at night he dons a costume and commits crime. Or fights crime. Or is a victim of crime. History will be the judge.

Abby Denson is a cartoonist and rock'n'roller in NYC. She is the creator of Tough Love: High School Confidential, Dolltopia, and Night Club, among others. She has scripted Powerpuff Girls and comics for Nickelodeon. She has webcomics on gurl.com and a dessert comic column in The L Magazine.

Daniel Lanza was born and raised in Northern California, but currently resides across country while he finishes a Masters in Humanities and Social Thought at New York University. His work has appeared in Toasted Cheese Literary Quarterly and Zephyr. Like half the known world, he is currently at work on a novel. He is also collaborating on a graphic novel which will, at some point, have a website.

Kat Meads's most recent book publication is a novel, The Invented Life of Kitty Duncan (Chiasmus Press). She lives in California.

Chris Nakashima-Brown lives in Austin, TX. His most recent story is in the anthology Fast Forward 2.

Kim Parko is a writer, visual artist, and seasoned worrier who lives in Santa Fe, NM with her husband and dog. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in 3rd bed, The Bitter Oleander, Caketrain, Diagram, and 5AM.

Mark Rich has two new fiction collections: Edge of Our Lives (RedJack) and Across the Sky (Fairwood). New stories are in Talebones, Tales of the Unanticipated, Zahir, and Analog. He is working on two books for McFarland, one on C.M. Kornbluth and what that author says about us, the other on Modern-century science fiction toys, and what they say about us. He and Martha Borchardt and Scottie Lorna, an avid squeak-toy aficionado, live in the Wisconsin coulee region.

Anna Sears is a writer/artist currently employed as a migrant holiday store worker in Staten Island, NY. She hopes to settle down soon and adopt a cat.

Angela Slatter is a Brisbane-based writer studying for a PhD in Creative Writing. Her stories have appeared in Shimmer, ONSPEC, Strange Tales II, and Twelfth Planet's 2012. Three of her stories gained honorable mentions in The Year's Best Fantasy & Horror 20; her story "The Angel Wood" was short-listed for the Aurealis Award, and she was short-listed for the Ditmars Best New Talent award in 2008.

Jodi Lynn Villers has her MFA from North Carolina State University. She lives in downtown Raleigh with a beagle named Turtle and has written a novella about a rehabilitation camp for girls who have killed their parents. Her short-shorts have also appeared in Staccato and Quick Fiction.

Susan Wardle is a graduate of Clarion South. Her fiction has been published in the Shadow Box e-anthology, Overland, Andromeda Spaceways, Antipodean SF, Fables & Reflections, Shadowed Realms, Ticonderoga Online, and The Outcast to name a few. Susan currently lives between Sydney and the South Coast (Australia) and spends her daylight hours (and some of her night time hours) working for local government.

Alex Wilson writes fiction and comics in Carrboro, NC. His work has appeared/will appear in Asimov's, The Rambler, Weird Tales, The Florida Review, Outlaw Territory II (Image), and elsewhere. He runs the audiobook project Telltale Weekly and publishes the minicomic/zine Inconsequential Art.

Nick Wolven's short fiction has appeared recently in Asimov's and Paradox. He lives in Brooklyn.

Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet No.23, A Celebration, November 2008 (but actually December—and very much looking forward to January 20, 2009). ISSN 1544-7782. Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996, LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., Easthampton, MA 01027 · info@smallbeerpress.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw

Subscriptions: $5 per single issue or $20/4. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library and institutional subscriptions available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as an ebook through fictionwise.com, lcrw.net, and lulu.com, and as a trade paperback from lulu.com/sbp.

Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Printed by Paradise Copies, 30 Craft Ave., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414.

Thanks for reading.

 

 



There are 60 pages in this zine. It was put together on a couple of MacBooks and an iMac using InDesign. No CEOs were fired during the production of this zine. At least, not here. One copy was printed on gold leaves and buried in a blatant attempt to copy The King's Last Song. This web page was written using an Old copy of DreamWeaver. One of these days we'll update the software and the website. One of these days. In the meantime we keep producing high-quality low-cost paper zine in part because 1) we'll keep doing this until the subscribers stop subscribing and the writers stop sending us good weird shit and 2) if we can do it, so can you.

masthead

Made in the May of 2008 by:
Gavin J. Grant · Kelly Link
Jedediah Berry · Michael Deluca · Katharine Duckett · Margaret Kinney · Sara Majka · Julia Botero

Fiction

William Alexander, "Away"
Charlie Anders, "Love Might Be Too Strong a Word"
Becca De La Rosa, "Vinegar and Brown Paper"
Kristine Dikeman, "Dearest Cecily"
Carol Emshwiller, "Self Story"
Alex Dally MacFarlane, "Snowdrops"
Maureen F. McHugh, "Going to France"
Jeremie McKnight, "The Camera & the Octopus"
Mark Rigney, "Portfolio"
David J. Schwartz, "Mike's Place"
Jodi Lynn Villers, "The Honeymoon Suite"
Caleb Wilson, "American Dreamers"
Cara Spindler, "Escape"
Miriam Allred, "To a Child Who Is Still a FAQ"

Poetry

Eileen Gunn, "To the Moon Alice"

Nonfiction

Gwenda Bond, Dear Aunt Gwenda

Comics

Abby Denson, "Snake Slayer"
Michael DeLuca, "The Freddie Mercury Challenge"

Cover
Derek Ford, Cover Art

Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet, No.22 June 2008. ISSN 1544-7782 Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996 LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · info@smallbeerpress.com | smallbeerpress.com/lcrw $5 per single issue or $20/4. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Thanks for reading. This zine is printed by Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060 413-585-0414

Who Was That Masked Writer?

William Alexander lives in Minneapolis with spouse and cat. His stories have appeared in Zahir, Weird Tales, and Postscripts, and one will be reprinted in Fantasy: The Best of the Year 2008. He contributes to Rain Taxi Review of Books. In the summer of '06 he attended the Clarion Workshop. It was fun.

Miriam Allred has a BA in Comparative Literature and French from Brigham Young University and an MA in English from Cleveland State University. She lives in Salt Lake City, near many supportive friends and family members, where she earns a living writing about routers and wireless networks. She also writes stories.

Charlie Jane Anders blogs about science fiction and futurism for io9.com. She's the author of Choir Boy and the co-editor of She's Such A Geek: Women Write About Science, Technology & Other Nerdy Stuff. Her writing has appeared in Mother Jones, Salon, Sex For America, Paraspheres, and MonkeyBicycle. She's the co-founder of other magazine and the host of a reading series, Writers With Drinks, in San Francisco.

Gwenda Bond is writing young adult novels on a tin machine that has no internet access.

Becca De La Rosa has recently had fiction published in Strange Horizons and the Fantasy Magazine anthology, among other places. She is currently studying English at an art college in Ireland.

Michael J. DeLuca has published fiction in Interfictions and Clockwork Phoenix. He makes beer and other libations in Massachusetts.

Abby Denson is a cartoonist and rock'n'roller in NYC. She is the creator of Tough Love: High School Confidential, Dolltopia, and Night Club, among others. She has scripted Powerpuff Girls and comics for Nickelodeon. She has webcomics on gurl.com and a dessert comic column, “The City Sweet Tooth†(citysweettooth.com) in The L Magazine. abbycomix.com Kristine Dikeman lives in NYC. Her work has appeared in The Many Faces of Van Helsing, The Book of Final Flesh, Sybil's Garage, and All Hallows. She is working on a novel, Eating Manhattan, a lighthearted romp through New York, with zombies.

Carol Emshwiller's most recent books are a novel, The Secret City, a young adult novel, Mr. Boots, and a collection, I Live with You. Small Beer published her novel The Mount and her collection, Report to the Men's Club as well as reprinting her first novel, Carmen Dog.Recent awards include a couple of Nebulas for short stories, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement. She lives in New York City.

Eileen Gunn is the author of a collection, Stable Strategies and Others, and co-editor of The WisCon Chronicles Two. She is the publisher of the Infinite Matrix, and in the dead of night can hear it stomping around in the attic. For nearly 20 years, she has been on the board of the Clarion West Writers Workshop and she thinks it's time for someone else to take over.

Alex Dally MacFarlane has been writing ever since the discovery of computer games made her think that if stories could be found on a 32-bit cartridge, why not in the mind of an 11-year-old girl? Her short fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Electric Velocipede, Shimmer, Sybil's Garage, Farrago's Wainscot, and a few other places. Her longer fiction is still being kick-polished.

Maureen F. McHugh's most recent book is a collection of short stories, Mothers & Other Monsters. She writes novels and Alternate Reality Games. She lives in Austin, Texas.

Jeremie McKnight was born under the restless skies of Ohio farm-country where he began his storytelling at an early age. By high school he was a published and award-winning author. And then he stopped. He now lives in Pittsburgh PA., and this is his first story in over a decade. It has made him very happy.

Mark Rigney is the author of Deaf Side Story: Deaf Sharks, Hearing Jets and a Classic American Musical. His short fiction has appeared in Shadow Regions, Talebones, The Bellevue Literary Review, Futures Mysterious Anthology Magazine, &c. His plays for the stage have won national contests and been performed in six states. Having worked as a zookeeper, he is now proud to be a stay-at-home father.

David J. Schwartz is all around you; here, between you, me, the tree, the rock, everywhere, yes. Even between the land and the ship. His first novel, Superpowers, is in stores as you are reading this. He is allergic to midichlorians.

Cara Spindler likes apples, broccoli, and eel, but hates ham and cantaloupe. She likes strolling, running, swimming—but hates to sit.
And she still has five continents to visit before she dies.

Jodi Lynn Villers has her MFA from North Carolina State University. She lives in downtown Raleigh with a beagle named Turtle and has written a novella about a rehabilitation camp for girls who have killed their parents. Her short-shorts have also appeared in Staccato and Quick Fiction.

Caleb Wilson's fiction has appeared in places like Diagram, Weird Tales, and The Year's Best Fantasy & Horror. He and his wife life in Illinois. His alter-ego works in a bookstore.



LCRW 21 is the latest iteration of the eleven-dimensional being known as LCRW. Although it has always been there, it began protruding into our space time consciousness in November of 2007 as a sixty-page stapled zine with a lovely creamy cover.

Humans cannot perceive the other seven dimensions of LCRW, but if they put it against the top of their head while jumping off a small box of caramels, they can get a hint of what they are missing.

Reviews

"I very much enjoyed reading LCRW #21; it's primarily fiction but also includes poetry, nonfiction, and comics. The layout and design is impeccable: crisp, clean, beautifully formatted. Carol Emshwiller is a regular contributor and the material itself covers a wide range, from odd boarding schools to a strange co-worker writing code (I don't want to say much more for fear of giving it away), and there isn't a single wrong note in here. Literary zines are sometimes a tough sell, but this one shouldn't be--it's well worth the time and money. (And there are even subscription options which include chocolate...)" —Xerography Debt

"If there’s an overarching theme to this issue it might be the assumption that the reader will accept the worlds and situations written here as they are–there is little or no explanation offered. All these stories have an other-worldly quality, like the stream-of-consciousness writing of a syntactical genius. These stories are a catalogue of madnesses, all carrying with them a sense of dread that never finds resolution, only the respite offered by the story’s end. That’s not to say that there isn’t humour here. Probably one of the greatest lines appears in the first story “The Night and Day War.” It’s a truth we’ve always known, but may not have had spelled out: “Vampires are made to wear clothing well and whale on people.” Even the ads aren’t a disruption to the mood: rather than an interruption, they seem to make a community out of what initially seems like a group of terminal navel-gazers. The overall effect is the feeling that you’ve been sucked into a fully-functioning surrealist society. Perhaps some of their stories are a touch long, and the last story in the collection is so cruel that it felt like a kick in the teeth, but these are definitely authors you want to spend some time with." —J. Blackmore, Broken Pencil

masthead
Made in the Autumn of 2007 by:
Gavin J. Grant · Kelly Link
Jedediah Berry · Michael Deluca · Annabel Link

Fiction
Alice Sola Kim, The Night and Day War
Adam Ares, The Curmudgeon
Matthew Cheney, The Lake
Stephanie Brady Tharpe, On a Dark and Featureless Plain
Jeannette Westwood, Two Variations
Kirstin Allio, Clay
Brian Conn, The Postern Gate
Benjamin Parzybok, The Coder
Corie Ralston, Maps to God
Carol Emshwiller, Sanctuary

Poetry
Lauren Bartel, Two Poems

Nonfiction
Gwenda Bond, Dear Aunt Gwenda
Mamoru Masuda, A Primer on New Wave and Speculative Fiction in Japan

Comics
Suzanne Baumann, The Blokes of Ball Point
Abby Denson, The Mysterious Mr. M.

Cover
Tatsuro Kiuchi

Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet, No.21 November 2007. ISSN 1544-7782 Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996 LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 (Please note that's a new address.) · info@smallbeerpress.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw $5 per single issue or $20/4. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Thanks for reading. This zine is printed by Paradise Copies, 30 Craft Ave., Northampton, MA 01060 413-585-0414

About the authors

Today's Writers Today

Kirstin Allio's novel Garner (Coffee House Press) was a finalist for the LA Times Book Award for First Fiction. She has recently been selected one of "5 Under 35" writers to watch (and hopefully read) by the National Book Foundation. She lives in Providence, RI with her husband and sons.

Adam Ares enjoys staring at blank word processor documents, reading books in languages that he doesn't really understand, and Galaga. Perhaps, in the future, he will put adamares.com to some better use than he does now.

Trained in yoga, baking and phlebotomy, Lauren Bartel lives in Minneapolis where she is currently involved with the newborn book publishing efforts of Whistling Shade Press, contributing to various food-related publications, and planting tomatoes.

Suzanne Baumann has been making minicomics for over a dozen years and plans to make many more. She feels most at ease in places where there are lots of pens and scraps of paper lying around.

Gwenda Bond is writing young adult novels while keeping her pets in line and her books close by.

Matthew Cheney has published fiction and nonfiction in Rabid Transit, Locus, Pindeldyboz, Strange Horizons, failbetter.com, Rain Taxi, English Journal, and other venues of questionable taste. He is the series editor for Best American Fantasy. He teaches high school in New Jersey.

Brian Conn grew up in a forest where it often rained on Christmas Eve. His work has also appeared in GUD and Sybil's Garage. He is an MFA student at Brown and a graduate of the Clarion West Writers Workshop. He lives in Providence, and the only thing that can make him laugh these days is Beckett.

Abby Denson is the creator of Tough Love: High School Confidential, Dolltopia, and Night Club. She has scripted Powerpuff Girls Comics, Simpsons Comics, and comics for Nickelodeon Magazine. She rocks out with her bands Abbymatic and The Saturday Night Things. She loves New York, container gardening, and her cat, Slinky.

Carol Emshwiller's most recent books are a novel, The Secret City, a young adult novel, Mr. Boots, and a collection, I Live with You. Small Beer published her novel The Mount and her collection, Report to the Men's Club as well as reprinting her first novel, Carmen Dog.Recent awards include a couple of Nebulas for short stories, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement. She lives in New York City.

Alice Sola Kim lives in San Francisco and works at a strange startup. Most recently, her job has involved gossiping about Nicole Richie eating a Kit Kat bar. Her work has appeared in Rabid Transit: Long Voyages, Great Lies, and is forthcoming in Strange Horizons.

Benjamin Parzybok is the publisher of Gumball Poetry, a literary journal published into gumball machines. He founded the Black Magic Insurance Agency which runs a city-wide mystery/treasure hunt called Operation Peachblow. He lives in Portland, OR, with the writer Laura Moulton and their son. He has two novels ready to go: Couch, in which three social misfits carry a couch from Oregon to South America and A Body of Water where a 20-something isn't sure whether to help his brother commit euthanasia.

Corie Ralston is a scientist by profession, although sometimes she wonders what on earth possessed her to go to graduate school. She writes in the spare nanoseconds of her life, in all the transitions, wishing always that there was more time. She has been published in Strange Horizons and a variety of other venues. She is absolutely determined to finish her novel. And she does not need utensils to hear her mother.

Stephanie Brady Tharpe is a lifelong resident of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. She spends her time writing, raising her fifteen-year-old daughter, and teaching English and Creatiove Writing at Skyline High School. Her poetry appears in multiple volumes of The Poet's Domain. This is her first fiction publication.

The Best of LCRW is doing fine, thanks for asking. How are you? Did Aunt Gwenda's answer help?

Jeannette Westwood still lives in California. Her newest hobby is stenciling and painting T-shirts.



aka 10 years of doing it all wrong.

masthead
Made in the autumn of 2006 by:
Gavin J. Grant · Kelly Link
Jedediah Berry · Michael Deluca · Heidi Smith · Lauren Smith · Caitlin Beck

fiction
Ray Vukcevich, Tubs
Daniel A. Rabuzzi, Grebe's Gift
Dennis Nau, Dropkick
Nancy Jane Moore, Phone Call Overheard on the Subway
Cara Spindler & David Erik Nelson, You Were Neither . . .
Kara Kellar Bell, The Bride
Andrew Fort, Lady Perdita Espadrille Tells the Story
Anna Tambour, The Slime: A Love Story
Carol Emshwiller, Such a Woman, Or, Sixties Rant

poetry
K.E. Duffin, Two Poems
Laura L. Washburn, The Troll in the Cellar
Katharine Beutner, Things That Make One's Heart Beat Faster
D.M. Gordon, Sliding

nonfiction
Dear Aunt Gwenda

cover artEric Schaller

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The Entertainers

Kara Kellar Bell has an Honours degree in Film and Media, and lives in the West of Scotland. Her writing has appeared in Bonfire, QWF, The Gay Read, Orphan Leaf Review, Aesthetica, Open Wide, the Showcase at laurahird.com, among other publications. She is currently completing a literary thriller.

Katharine Beutner lives in Austin, Texas, where she writes novels, eats fish tacos, and studies for advanced degrees in unremunerative fields. This is her first publication.

Gwenda Bond shoots big fish in big ponds. From Kentucky, or other, less interesting places, she blogs at Shaken & Stirred.

K.E. Duffin is the author of a collection of poems, King Vulture (University of Arkansas Press). Her poems have appeared in Agni, Chelsea, Denver Quarterly, Harvard Review, The New Orleans Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, Rattapallax, The Sewanee Review, Verse, and have been featured on Poetry Daily and Verse Daily. A painter and printmaker, Duffin lives in Somerville, Massachusetts.


Carol Emshwiller was recently awarded a Life Achievement World Fantasy Award. She is the author of the a number of collections, including Report to the Men's Club and I Live With You, and the novels The Mount, Carmen Dog, Ledoyt, and the upcoming Secret City.

Andrew Fort writes fiction when he is not hunting bears, panthers, dragons, or dinosaurs with a Tinkertoy gun. He lives with his wife Jennifer and son Noah in Portland, Oregon, where they are sometimes gloomy but never S.A.D. His limited-edition novel The Emerald Ballroom is available through readingfrenzy.com or powells.com.

Previously an equestrian and chamber musician, D. M. Gordon moved to The Pioneer Valley in Massachusetts and drank the waters. Now she writes. Her short stories and poems have appeared in Nimrod, Weber Studies, and the Northwest Review. She is a 2006 finalist for the Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Grant in fiction, and a 2004 finalist for the same in poetry.

Nancy Jane Moore's novella Changeling is part of the Conversation Pieces series from Aqueduct Press. She expresses political opinions on In This Moment.

Dennis Nau graduated from St. Thomas College in St. Paul in 1971, educated to teach high school English but with a burning desire to conquer the world with his guitar. He was able to do neither. His stories have been published in Heartlands and Big Muddy. He is the mayor of Gibbon, Minnesota, and gets to discuss interesting subjects like barking dogs and cat licensing on a daily basis.

David Erik Nelson is a co-founder and editor for Poor Mojo's Almanac(k), purveyor of fine prose, poetry and advice from the Giant Squid. Mr. Nelson is startlingly accurate with a small caliber pistol, and he is Cara Spindler's husband.

Daniel Rabuzzi lived in Norway and Germany, earning degrees in folklore and history. An executive in an education non-profit by day, Daniel explores a world called Yount by night and on weekends. Having finished one novel about Yount, Daniel is working on a sequel and hopes to share Yount with other pilgrims soon.

If you're the sort who keeps an ear glued to the keyhole, your eyes on the ground, and your head on the railroad track, you might have seen Eric Schaller's cartoons featuring the character Sad Bird in the zine The White Buffalo Gazette. He contributed illustrations to Jeff VanderMeer's The City of Saints and Madmen and has fiction forthcoming in Postscripts and The New Book of Masks.

Cara Spindler lives and works in Michigan. A long, long time ago, her favorite book was The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. She is suitably ashamed of this, but is willing to admit people are fallible (now).

Anna Tambour currently lives in the Australian bush with a large family of other species, including one man. Her collection Monterra's Deliciosa & Other Tales & and her novel Spotted Lily are Locus Recommended Reading List selections. medlarcomfits.blogspot.com

Ray Vukcevich's collection, Meet Me in the Moon Room, was published by Small Beer Press, and his novel, The Man of Maybe Half-a-Dozen Faces, by St. Martin's. He also works as a programmer in a couple of university brain labs in Oregon.

Laura Lee Washburn is an Associate Professor of English at Pittsburgh State U., an editorial board member of the Woodley Memorial Press, and the author of This Good Warm Place (March Street) and Watching the Contortionists (Palanquin Chapbook Prize). Her poetry has appeared in such journals as Carolina Quarterly, Quarterly West, The Sun, and Clackamas Review.

Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet No.19 November 2006 (10 Year Issue). ISSN 1544-7782 Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996 LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press, 176 Prospect Ave., Northampton, MA 01060 · info@lcrw.net $5 per single issue or $20/4. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Printed by Paradise Copies, 30 Craft Ave., Northampton, MA01060 413-585-0414. Thanks for reading.



Gavin J. Grant. Cake is love.
Kelly Link. Cake is cake.
Diane Kelly, Vanessa Scott. Interns is interns.

Contents

Fiction

David J. Schwartz -- The Ichthymancer Writes His Friend with an Account of the Yeti's Birthday Party
Eliot Fintushel -- Kukla Boogie Moon
Leslie What -- The Changeling
Richard Polney -- The Faith of Metal in Ghosts
M. Thomas -- The Poor Man's Wife
Tim Pratt -- Rowboats, Sacks of Gold
E.L. Chen -- White Rabbit Triptych
Philip Brewer -- Salesman
F. Brett Cox -- Legacy
Veronica Schanoes -- Serpents
Karina Sumner-Smith -- A Last Taste of Sweetness
Hannah Bowen -- Pinned
Sarah Monette -- Sidhe Tigers
Geoffrey H. Goodwin -- The Magnificent Dachshund
K.Z. Perry -- Mama's Special Rice Tin
Spencer Keralis -- The Meat and the Mushrooms

Nonfiction

Gavin J. Grant -- Home and Security
-- Zine Reviews
Gwenda Bond -- Dear Aunt Gwenda
Lucy Snyder -- The Guest Film Column: The Salton Sea

Poetics

Mario Milosevic -- Lunar Fate
Jason Stewart -- The Greebles
David Blair -- Four Poems

Art

Mieke Zuiderweg -- Anticipation (Cover)
James Campbell -- Untitled

Contributors

David Blair's poems have appeared in AGNI, The Greensboro Review, International Poetry Review, and Chicago Review.

Gwenda Bond is not a senior administration official.She writes screenplays and fiction, usually in the environs of lovely downtown Lexington, Kentucky, though not usually set there. Her scripts have placed in the Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting and Austin Heart of Screenwriting competitions, and her fiction has been published in The Journal of Pulse-Pounding Narratives and ...is this a cat? She co-edits the magazine Say... with writer Christopher Rowe.

Hannah Wolf Bowen is a Philosophy major, an assistant editor for the Fortean Bureau, and the person of an ungrateful (yet adorable) horse and a neurotic (yet adorable) dog. Some of her stories have found homes. Others have not. These things happen.

Philip Brewer has a day job as a software engineer, but his work is writing science fiction and fantasy stories. He speaks Esperanto and uses it to communicate with people all over the world. He graduated from Clarion in 2001.

James Campbell writes and draws somewhere to the west of this magazine.

E.L. Chen works hard for the money, so you'd better treat her right. She has been previously published in On Spec and Challenging Destiny.

F. Brett Cox's fiction has been published Century, Black Gate, The North Carolina Literary Review, Indigenous Fiction, Carriage House Review, Say..., and elsewhere. His essays, reviews, and interviews have appeared in numerous publications, including The New England Quarterly, The New York Review of Science Fiction, Paradoxa, Science Fiction Studies, Locus Online, The Robert Frost Encyclopedia, and Science Fiction Weekly. He is co-editor, with Andy Duncan, ofCrossroads: Southern Stories of the Fantastic (Tor, 2004). Brett has served as a juror for the Theodore Sturgeon Award and as a member of the advisory board for the current edition of Contemporary Novelists. He holds an M.A. in English with emphasis in creative writing from the University of South Carolina and a Ph.D. in English with emphasis in American literature from Duke University. A native of North Carolina, Brett is Assistant Professor of English at Norwich University in Northfield,Vermont. He lives in Northfield with his wife, the playwright Jeanne Beckwith.

Eliot Fintushel is an itinerant showman now living in Santa Rosa, CA, hard by the fairgrounds and between the transmission shops and the horse stalls. He has written many stories, mostly published in Asimov's. His work has been nominated for the Nebula and Sturgeon Awards. He has twice received the NEA Solo Performer Award. His current touring show, employing masks and ancient music in the original tongues, is Apocalypse, a solo performance comprising the entire Book of Revelation word for word in the translation commissioned by King James in 1611!

Geoffrey Goodwin is a generous man who works in a bookshop outside Boston, MA. This is his second story for LCRW. He is not worried by this.

Amy Hannum is an interior designer based in New London, CT. She is the subject and the artist of the cover photo, "Anticipation," by Mieke Zuiderweg.

Spencer Keralis grew up in Wyoming but now lives in Minneapolis, which is colder. His written work has appeared in The Dry Crik Review of Contemporary Cowboy Poetry, The Owen Wister Review, stet Magazine, and The Plastic Tower, among others. In another life he co-authored a textbook on Asynchronous Transfer Mode circuits now in use at a major telecommunications corporation, but that's a long story and really not very interesting.

Mario Milosevic's poems and stories have appeared in dozens of magazines and in the anthologyPoets Against the War. He lives in the Pacific Northwest with his wife, novelist Kim Antieau.

Sarah Monette collects ghosts in books, pressing them between the leaves like dried flowers. She has sold stories to LCRW, Alchemy, Tales of the Unanticipated, All Hallows, and Lovecraft's Weird Mysteries. Her story "Three Letters from the Queen of Elfland," from LCRW 11, won the 2003 Gaylactic Spectrum Award.

K.Z. Perry's stories have recently appeared in MOTA 3: Courage, Talebones, Book of More Flesh, The Urban Bizarre, and Problem Child. She lives in New York.

Rick Polney is an adjunct professor of English and Humanities, a former Army officer, a sometimes performance artist, and an unrepentant risk-taker. He is a graduate of the Clarion Science Fiction Writing Workshop and studied writing under Chip Delany at Temple University. He has been published in TurboCharged Fortune Cookie and Schuylkill.

Tim Pratt lives in Oakland, California, where he works as an assistant editor for Locusmagazine. His stories have appeared in Realms of Fantasy, The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror, Strange Horizons, and other nice places, and he has work upcoming in The Third Alternativeand The Journal of Pulse-Pounding Narratives. His first collection, Little Gods, was published by Prime Books in September 2003. With his fiancee Heather Shaw he co-edits a zine calledFlytrap.

Veronica Schanoes is from New York City. She won the 2002 William Carlos Williams Prize from the Academy of American Poets. This
is her first non-academic publication. She's very, very pleased.

David J. Schwartz is the reincarnation of a famous dancing bear who once entertained thousands of Bolivian mine workers. He is indigenous to the Midwestern United States, and traces of his spoor have appeared in On Spec and flashquake.org. He is a graduate of the Odyssey Fantasy Writing Workshop and prefers tea, thank you. He keeps a reading journal and he would be humbly pleased if you would read it.

Lucy A. Snyder lives in Columbus, OH. Her writing has appeared in publications such asChiaroscuro, Snow Monkey, Strange Horizons, The Midnighters' Club and Cumberland House'sGuardian Angels anthology.

Jason Stewart lives between the toes of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. With his two cats, he watches a tiny door in his living room which he has never opened, for fear of finding greebles. When he's not consumed by these fears, he spends his time at Colorado University where he works in the library and is finishing his BA in English. His work has appeared inAlmagre, Riverrun, and BLAH.

Karina Sumner-Smith is a student, a writer, a Clarion grad and an adventure racing fanatic. She listens to others' conversations on the bus without hesitation or regret, worries over pennies and scribbles stories on the back of in-class handouts. She is irritated that she must wear her glasses to read signs at distances or distinguish the faces of friends from strangers in a faraway crowd; is it too much to ask to retain one's vision at the age of 22? She lives in Toronto.

M. Thomas is a writer and teacher in Austin, Texas. She is a short story editor and contributor for the ezine Deep Magic. Her fiction has previously appeared in Deep Magic, Abyss & Apex,and Strange Horizons. She dabbles in magic realism, humor, and young adult fantasy.

Leslie What is a Jell-O artist and writer from Oregon. Her writing has won awards for drama, nonfiction, and fiction, including a Nebula Award for short story. Her comic novel Olympic Games will be published in 2004.

Mieke M. Zuiderweg is a photojournalist in Western Massachusetts who is trying to work up the courage to walk away from taking pictures of angry mourners and burning buildings to pursue a career soley based on her photo illustrations and picture experiments. She resides in Northampton but is originally from the Netherlands. Hence the unpronounceable name. "Anticipation" is a photograph of the work of interior designer Amy Hannum.

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Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet, No.13 November 2003. ISSN 1544-7782 Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996 LCRW has usually appeared twice a year. As of 2004, there will be three issues per year: April, July, & November. LCRW springs forth from Small Beer Press, 176 Prospect Ave., Northampton, MA 01060 info@smallbeerpress.com www.smallbeerpress.com/lcrw $4 per single issue or $16/4. Except, as the sharp-eyed observer may have noticed, this issue is $5. This is an experiment (look at that art! look at that binding!) and may or may not be a good idea.

Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, &c. should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. If there were torpedoes, we'd have to build a dam. As it is, how about a new ship of state?